Minutes of a conversation with Napoleon Bonaparte, during his residence at Elba, in January, 1815

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Ridgway, 1839 - 40 pages
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Page 23 - Pope was a very good sort of person (un bien ban homme) ; that he had entertained him very well at Fontainbleau, and made him very comfortable there ; that he (the Pope) was ignorant in the extreme ; and that amongst all his cardinals (for he had seen them all at Paris,) there was not one he would allow to fill a fourth rank in his (Bonaparte's) council. Ecclesiastical states, he added, should on no account be allowed ; the empire of the church was not of this world. " Speaking of the Americans,...
Page 20 - they were officered by British, and of this the national pride (Fierte) of the Spaniards would not admit; — besides, the Spaniards are bigots in religion, and you know that you are heretics " (vous savez que vous ites des heretiques,) said he, laughing.
Page 12 - We found him standing by the fire, at the further end of a room adjoining the ante-chamber, and into which he had come, on being informed of our arrival. This room was about the size of that we had left, and was fitted up with old yellow furniture, brought, as we understood, from the palace of his sister, at Piombino. On our entrance, he advanced towards us, and we took our station with our backs against a table that stood between the windows. Whilst he was advancing he began the conversation...
Page 19 - ... the Allies a fortnight before, and that he had narrowly escaped being massacred by his soldiers for his conduct. — I observed to him, that when I had passed through Paris, I had heard there was an opinion amongst the lower orders, that he and Paris had been sold— "que FEmpereur et Paris tioient vendus...
Page 24 - He said, that when America became more powerful, she would probably rival us in our marine; that he had made the attempt to do this, but had failed. With respect to the Right of Search, which I called a droit, he said it was no droit, but a mere thtorie; that when we were very strong we should exercise it, but if, on the contrary, we had Russia, Sweden, and Denmark against us, we probably should not insist on it. He gave it as his opinion, that England and France should be allied. On my signifying,...
Page 20 - César explique cette opposi, ion apparente. « Si le courage des Gaulois est empressé à entreprendre des guerres, leur âme n'est pas propre à supporter les désastres.
Page 17 - Congres dance mats ne marche pas' — at which he smiled. I added, that Poland was understood to be a stumbling-block; that it was said the Emperor of Russia wanted to form a kingdom of it, but that the other powers, it was supposed, feared Russia's becoming too formidable. He remarked that it was a power that went...
Page 23 - France cut succomb&e) and that the war, after all, was about nothing — a few feet more or less of lake. He then said something of a great project he had with respect to Mexico, of which I could not catch the meaning ; and observed, that we should one day or other lose Canada ; adding — " of what great consequence is it to England, with her numerous colonies...
Page 18 - Allies were not sincere,* and that besides les choses at that time were different ; that had peace been then made, England would have been saved some thousands of men and much money ; that he considered it very bad policy of England to appropriate Belgium to herself; that it would be a constant source of expense, and would probably draw her into a war ; for that any other continental power would be sure of France as an ally, by offering Belgium as a bribe. "Supposing," said he, "for instance, Russia...
Page 24 - Ah! then you will see there a magnificent Lazarone ;':* adding, " From Naples, I suppose, you return to England by sea." Upon my saying that it was my intention to return by Italy and the Mont Cenis, as I had seen all the other Passes * Alluding to Murat.

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