Merchants and Revolution: Commercial Change, Political Conflict, and London's Overseas Traders, 1550-1653

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Merchants and Revolution examines the activities of London's merchant community during the early Stuart period. Proposing a new understanding of long-term commercial change, Robert Brenner explains the factors behind the opening of long-distance commerce to the south and east, describing how the great City merchants wielded power to exploit emerging business opportunities, and he profiles the new colonial traders, who became the chief architects of the Commonwealth's dynamic commercial policy.
 

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Contents

and the Redistribution of Wealth and Power 15501640
51
Development
92
The Rise of Merchant Opposition in the 16205
199
The Merchant Community the Caroline Regime and
240
REVOLUTION 16421653
393
Political Independents New Merchants and the Common
558
The New Merchants and Commercial Policy under
577
The New Merchants and the Fall of the Commonwealth
633
Index
717
Copyright

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About the author (2003)

Robert Brenner is Director of the Center for Social Theory and Comparative History at UCLA. He is the author of The Boom and the Bubble, Merchants and Revolution, The Economics of Global Turbulence and co-editor of Rebel Rank and File.

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