Masters, Servants, and Magistrates in Britain and the Empire, 1562-1955

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Douglas Hay, Paul Craven
Univ of North Carolina Press, 2004 - Law - 592 pages
Master and servant acts, the cornerstone of English employment law for more than four hundred years, gave largely unsupervised, inferior magistrates wide discretion over employment relations, including the power to whip, fine, and imprison men, women, and

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Contents

Introduction Douglas Hay and Paul Craven
1
England 15621875 The Law and Its Uses Douglas Hay
59
Early British America 15851830 Freedom Bound Christopher Tomlins
117
Law and Labor in EighteenthCentury Newfoundland Jerry Bannister
153
Canada 16701935 Symbolic and Instrumental Enforcement in Loyalist North America Paul Craven
175
Australia 17881902 A Workingmans Paradise? Michael Quinlan
219
The Colonial Office 18201955 Constantly the Subject of Small Struggles M K Banton
251
The British Caribbean 18231838 The Transition from Slave to Free Legal Status Mary Turner
303
Britain The Defeat of the 1844 Master and Servants Bill Christopher Frank
402
India 18581930 The Illusion of Free Labor Michael Anderson
422
Assam and the West Indies 18601920 Immobilizing Plantation Labor Prabhu P Mohapatra
455
West Africa 18741948 Employment Legislation in a Nonsettler Peasant Economy Richard Rathbone
481
Kenya 18951939 Registration and Rough Justice David M Anderson
498
Bibliography of Secondary Works Cited
529
Contributors
561
Index of Statutes
565

Urban British Guiana 18381924 Wharf Rats Centipedes and Pork Knockers Juanita De Barros
323
South Africa 18411924 Race Contract and Coercion Martin Chanock
338
Hong Kong 18411870 All the Servants in Prison and Nobody to Take Care of the House Christopher Munn
365

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About the author (2004)

Douglas Hay is associate professor of law and history at York University. He is coauthor of Eighteenth-Century English Society and coeditor of Policing and Prosecution in Britain, 1750-1850.

Douglas Hay is associate professor of law and history at York University. He is coauthor of Eighteenth-Century English Society and coeditor of Policing and Prosecution in Britain, 1750-1850.

Paul Craven is associate professor of labor studies at York University. He is editor of Labouring Lives: Work and Workers in Nineteenth-Century Ontario and author of An Impartial Umpire: Industrial Relations and the Canadian State, 1900-1911.

Paul Craven is associate professor of labor studies at York University. He is editor of Labouring Lives: Work and Workers in Nineteenth-Century Ontario and author of An Impartial Umpire: Industrial Relations and the Canadian State, 1900-1911.

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