Macroecology: Concepts and Consequences: 43rd Symposium of the British Ecological Society

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Tim M. Blackburn, Kevin J. Gaston
Cambridge University Press, 2003 - Nature - 442 pages
Macroecology: Concepts and Consequences brings together for the first time major researchers in the field to present overviews of current thinking about the form and determinants of macroecological patterns. Each section presents different viewpoints on the answer to a key question in macroecology, such as why are most species rare, why are most species small-bodied, and why are most species restricted in their distribution?
 

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Contents

Introduction why macroecology?
1
Why are some taxa more diverse than others?
13
Evolutionary analysis of species richness patterns in aquatic beetles why macroecology needs a historical perspective
15
The unified phenomenological theory of biodiversity
29
Why are most species rare?
41
The neutral theory of biodiversity and biogeography and beyond
43
Breaking the stick in space of niche models metacommunities and patterns in the relative abundance of species
62
Why are there more species in the tropics?
83
Routes to extinction
214
Why are species not more widely distributed?
233
Why are species not more widely distributed? Physiological and environmental limits
235
Macroecology and microecology linking largescale patterns of abundance to population processes
252
Genetics and the boundaries of species distributions
270
Why are there interspecific allometries?
293
Intraspecific body size optimization produces interspecific allometries
295
Scaling the macroecological and evolutionary implications of size and metabolism within and across plant taxa
317

How to reject the area hypothesis of latitudinal gradients
85
Climaticenergetic explanations of diversity a macroscopic perspective
103
The importance of historical processes in global patterns of diversity
126
Why are more species smallbodied?
149
Why are most species smallbodied? A phylogenetic view
151
Adaptive diversification of body size the roles of physical constraint energetics and natural selection
170
Why are some species more likely to become extinct?
189
Life histories and extinction risk
191
Why is macroecology important?
339
Macroecology and conservation biology
341
Evolutionary macroecology and the fossil record
364
Comparative methods for adaptive radiations
387
The next step in macroecology from general empirical patterns to universal ecological laws
404
Index
421
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About the author (2003)

Dr Blackburn's research at the University of Birmingham is concerned with a broad range of large-scale patterns and processes in ecology.

Professor Gaston's research at Sheffield focuses on the fields of biodiversity and macroecology, with the central theme being the study of variation in geographic distributions of species.

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