Introduction to Population Ecology

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John Wiley & Sons, Mar 12, 2009 - Science - 352 pages
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Introduction to Population Ecology is an accessible and up-to-date textbook covering all aspects of population ecology.

  • Discusses field and laboratory data to illustrate the fundamental laws of population ecology.
  • Provides an overview of how population theory has developed.
  • Explores single-species population growth and self-limitation; metapopulations; and a broad range of interspecific interactions including parasite-host, predator-prey, and plant-herbivore.
  • Keeps the mathematics as simple as possible, using a careful step-by-step approach and including graphs and other visual aids to help understanding.

Artwork from the book is available to instructors online at www.blackwellpublishing.com/rockwood and by request on CD-ROM.

 

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Contents

Part I Singlespecies populations
1
1 Densityindependent growth
5
12 Fundamentals of population growth
7
13 Types of models
10
14 Densityindependent versus densitydependent growth
12
16 Exponential growth in populations with overlapping generations
15
17 Exponential growth in an invasive species
19
18 Applications to human populations
20
66 Cost of reproduction and allocation of energy
147
67 Clutch size
148
68 Latitudinal gradients in clutch size
149
69 Predation and its effects on lifehistory characteristics
150
610 Bet hedging
151
612 Conclusions
153
Part II Interspeci c interactions
155
7 Interspeci c competition
159

19 The nite rate of increase l and the intrinsic rate of increase r
23
110 Stochastic models of population growth and population viability analysis
24
111 Conclusions
32
2 Densitydependent growth and intraspeci c competition
33
22 Density dependence in populations with discrete generations
36
23 Density dependence in populations with overlapping generations
42
24 Nonlinear density dependence of birth and death rates and the Allee effect
47
25 Time lags and limit cycles
52
26 Chaos and behavior of the discrete logistic model
54
27 Adding stochasticity to densitydependent models
56
28 Laboratory and eld data
58
29 Behavioral aspects of intraspeci c competition
60
210 Conclusions
65
3 Population regulation
66
32 What is population regulation?
67
33 Combining densitydependent and densityindependent factors
68
34 Tests of density dependence
69
35 Conclusions
76
4 Populations with age structures
77
42 Survivorship
79
43 Fertility
86
44 Mortality curves
88
45 Expectation of life
89
46 Net reproductive rategeneration timeand the intrinsic rate of increase
91
47 Age structure and the stable age distribution
93
48 Projecting population growth in agestructured populations
94
49 The Leslie or population projection matrix
96
410 A second version of the Leslie matrix
97
411 The Lefkovitch modi cation of the Leslie matrix
99
412 Dominant latent roots and the characteristic equation
100
413 Reproductive value
102
sensitivity analysis
105
5 Metapopulation ecology
108
52 Metapopulations and spatial ecology
109
53 MacArthur and Wilson and the equilibrium theory
112
54 The Levins or classical metapopulation
115
55 Extinction in metapopulations
118
57 Source sink metapopulations and the rescue effect
120
58 Nonequilibrium and patchy metapopulations
121
510 Minimum viable metapopulation size
126
511 Assumptions and evidence for the existence of metapopulations in nature
127
512 Conclusions
130
6 Lifehistory strategies
131
62 Power laws
136
63 The metabolic theory of ecology
139
64 Cole and Lewontin
140
65 The theory of r and K selection
145
early experiments and the competitive exclusion principle
160
73 The Lotka Volterra competition equations
162
74 Laboratory experiments and competition
168
75 Resourcebased competition theory
170
76 Spatial competition and the competition colonization tradeoff
176
77 Evidence for competition from nature
179
78 Indirect evidence for competition and natural experiments
181
79 Conclusions
187
8 Mutualism
188
82 Modeling mutualism
191
the costs of mutualism
192
9 Host parasite interactions
194
92 Factors affecting microparasite population biology
196
93 Modeling host microparasite interactions
197
94 Dynamics of the disease
198
95 Immunization
201
96 Endangered metapopulations and disease
203
97 Social parasites
205
98 Conclusions
206
10 Predator prey interactions
207
102 The Lotka Volterra equations
216
103 Early tests of the Lotka Volterra models
218
104 Functional responses
220
105 Adding prey density dependence and the type II and III functional responses to the Lotka Volterra equations
224
106 The graphical analyses of Rosenzweig and MacArthur
227
107 Use of a halfsaturation constant in predator prey interactions
231
108 Parasitoid host interactions and the Nicholson Bailey models
232
eld studies
236
1010 Trophic cascades
246
1012 Escape from predation
247
1013 Conclusions
251
11 Plant herbivore interactions
252
112 Classes of chemical defenses
254
113 Constitutive versus induced defense
259
114 Plant communication
261
116 A classic set of data reconsidered
262
118 Detoxi cation of plant compounds by herbivores
263
119 Plant apparency and chemical defense
264
1110 Soil fertility and chemical defense
265
1112 Modeling plant herbivore population dynamics
266
the complexities of herbivore plant interactions
272
Appendix 1 Problem sets
277
the basics
281
Mathematical symbols used in this book
287
References
294
Index
315
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About the author (2009)

Larry L. Rockwood is Associate Professor of Environmental Science and Policy at George Mason University, Virginia. He received his B.S. degree in Biopsychology from the University of Chicago, where he also completed his doctoral research on the foraging patterns of leaf-cutting ants. He has taught courses in population ecology for 30 years.

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