How Scholars Trumped Teachers: Change Without Reform in University Curriculum, Teaching, and Research, 1890-1990

Front Cover
Teachers College Press, Jan 1, 1999 - Education - 280 pages
0 Reviews

Examining a century of university history, Larry Cuban tackles the age-old question: What is more important, teaching or research? Using two departments (history and medicine) at Stanford University as a case study, Cuban shows how universities have organizationally and politically subordinated teaching to research for over one hundred years. He explains how university reforms, decade after decade, not only failed to dislodge the primacy of research but actually served to strengthen it. He examines the academic work of research and teaching to determine how each has influenced university structures and processes, including curricular reform. Can the dilemma of scholars vs. teachers ever be fully reconciled?

This fascinating historical journey is a must read for all university administrators, faculty, researchers, and anyone concerned with educational reform.

 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

HOW THE INVENTION OF THE UNIVERSITYCOLLEGE LED TO A CENTURY OF DILEMMAS AND A TRADITION OF REFORM AT STAN...
13
HOW UNIVERSITIES TAME REFORM TO PRESERVE THE RESEARCH IMPERATIVE Or Why There Is Change Without Reform
61
SCHOLARTEACHERS IN THE STANFORD HISTORY DEPARTMENT 18911990
91
A STURDY WAY OF PREPARING PHYSICIANS The School of Medicine 19081990
133
HOW RESEARCH TRUMPED TEACHING IN HISTORY AND MEDICINE
165
SCHOLARS OR TEACHERS How Much Change Is Possible?
191
NOTES
207
REFERENCES
251
INDEX
265
ABOUT THE AUTHOR
280
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 23 - ... education, rather than the development of a technique in Political Science, Economics, or Law. We may judge that this was the approach of the faculty of Stanford University some years ago when a committee, in reporting upon certain changes in curriculum, including a required course in citizenship, said: "Generally speaking, all freshmen are either now or soon to be voters. Does not the University owe them a duty as such? If our tritest sayings are true, these freshmen are destined to become leaders...
Page 24 - They are forming the political and economic and social ideas that will characterize that leadership. And they are forming them now while the air is full of strange doctrines and without waiting for a critical and scholarly insight. Can the University not render a substantial social service by providing a sound basis of elementary scientific facts and principles by which the validity of these doctrines may be tested?
Page 19 - Their presence and example will be, perhaps, worth more to the student body a hundred-fold than the precepts and drill of the others. They set high standards of thought. They help to create the university spirit, without which any college is but a grammar school of little higher pretensions. And above and beyond all learning is the...

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (1999)

Larry Cuban is Professor of Education at Stanford University. He is co-author (with David Tyack) of Tinkering Toward Utopia (1995) and author of How Teachers Taught: Constancy and Change in American Classrooms, 1890-1990 (1993) and Teachers and Machines: The Classroom Use of Technology Since 1920(1986).

Bibliographic information