His Master's Voice

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Northwestern University Press, 1999 - Fiction - 199 pages
2 Reviews
"Twenty-five hundred scientists have been herded into an isolated site in the Nevada desert. A neutrino message of extraterrestrial origin has been received, and, under the surveillance of the Pentagon, the scientists labor on His Master's Voice, the secret program set up to decipher the transmission."--BOOK JACKET. "Among them is Peter Hogarth, an eminent mathematician whose posthumous diary makes up the novel. Hogarth joins His Master's Voice after all efforts to decode the message prove futile and, after an early success, gives up on the project to pursue clandestine research into the so-called TX effect. Hogarth comes to realize that the TX effect could lead to the construction of the ultimate weapon - a fission bomb - and that such knowledge must not be allowed into the hands of the military."--BOOK JACKET. "Originally published in 1968, His Master's Voice takes to task the military takeover of scientific research, Cold War - era politics, and humanity's perpetual capacity for (self-)destruction. It remains a mordant satire on scientific microworlds and the monstrous political and military systems bankrolling them."--BOOK JACKET.
 

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Contents

Chapter 1
19
Chapter 2
28
Chapter 3
35
Chapter 4
48
Chapter 5
73
Chapter 6
81
Chapter 7
89
Chapter 8
97
Chapter 10
116
Chapter 11
122
Chapter 12
132
Chapter 13
139
Chapter 14
164
Chapter 15
168
Chapter 16
174
Chapter 17
179

Chapter 9
106

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About the author (1999)

Polish science fiction writer Stanislaw Lem was born on September 12, 1921. A medical graduate of Cracow University, he is at home both in the sciences and in philosophy, and this broad erudition gives his writings genuine depth. He has published extensively, not only fiction, but also theoretical studies. His books have been translated into 41 languages and sold over 27 million copies. He gained international acclaim for The Cyberiad, a series of short stories, which was first published in 1974. A trend toward increasingly serious philosophical speculation is found in his later works, such as Solaris (1961), which was made into a Soviet film by Russian director Andrei Tarkovsky in 1972 and remade by Steven Soderbergh in 2002. He died on March 27, 2006 in Krakow at the age of 84.

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