Gesenius' Hebrew Grammar

Front Cover
Clarendon Press, 1898 - Hebrew language - 598 pages
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Review: Gesenius' Hebrew Grammar Second Edition

User Review  - Joel Hamme - Christianbook.com

This is a superb reference grammar, and a classic by one of the luminaries in Hebrew Grammar from the 19th century. It is the old standard that has been replaced by Jouon and Muraoka. Gesenius does ... Read full review

Review: Gesenius' Hebrew Grammar Second Edition

User Review  - Jonathan Beyer - Christianbook.com

This is an excellent Hebrew reference analyzing various forms of syntactical occurrences. I liken it to A. T. Robertson's "A Grammar of the Greek New Testament in the Light of Historical Research", except it is for the Hebrew Bible. Its table of contents is extremely helpful Read full review

Contents

Mappiq and Raphe
55
The Accents
56
Of Maqqeph and Methfeg
62
OftheQereand Kethibh
64
the Syllable and the Tone 18 In general
66
The Doubling strengthening and sharpening of Consonants
69
The Aspiration of the Tenues
73
Peculiarities of the Gutturals
77
The Feebleness of the Aspirates X and fl 24 Changes of the Weak Letters 1 and
81
Firm or Immovable Vowels 73 75 78 Si
83
Syllableformation and its Influence on the Quantity of Vowels
84
The Change of the Vowels especially as regards Quantity
87
The Rise of New Vowels and Syllables
92
The Tone its Changes and the Pause
94
Biliteral Triliteral and Quadriliteral
99
Grammatical Structure
104
The Pronoun 32 The Personal Pronoun The Separate Pronoun
105
Pronominal Suffixes
108
The Demonstrative Pronoun
109
The Article no 36 The Relative Pronoun
113
The Verb 38 General View
115
40 Tenses Moods Flexion
118
Variations from the Ordinary Form of the Strong Verb
119
A The Pure Stem or Qal 43 Its Form and Meaning
120
The Infinitive
124
The Imperative
125
The Imperfect and its Inflexion
127
Shortening and Lengthening of the Imperfect and Imperative The Jussive and Cohortative
131
The Perfect and Imperfect with Waw Consecutive
135
The Participle
138
B Verba Derivativa or Derived Conjugations PACE 51 Niphal
139
Piel and Pual
143
Hiphil and Hophal
151
Hithpael
153
Less Common Conjugations
155
Quadriliterals
156
Strong Verb with Pronominal Suffixes 57 In general
158
The Pronominal Suffixes of the Verb
159
The Perfect with Pronominal Suffixes
162
Imperfect with Pronominal Suffixes
165
Infinitive Imperative and Participle with Pronominal Suffixes
167
Verbs with Gutturals 62 In general
169
Verbs First Guttural
170
Verbs Middle Guttural
174
Verbs Third Guttural
177
Verbs Primae Radicalis Nun fa
179
67 Verbs yV
181
The Weakest Verbs Verba Quiescentia
190
68 Verbs ND
191
Verbs B First Class or Verbs originally IS
193
Verbs D Second Class or Verbs properly D
199
Verbs D Third Class or Verbs with Y6dh assimilated
200
Verbs V vulgo VV
210
Verbs Kb
213
Verbs n5
215
Verbs Doubly Weak
226
Relation of the Weak Verbs to one another
228
Verba Defectiva
229
The Noun 79 General View
231
The Indication of Gender in Nouns
232
Derivation of Nouns
235
Verbal Nouns in General
236
84a Nouns derived from the Simple Stem
238
b Formation of Nouns from the Intensive Stem
243
Nouns with Preformatives and Afformattves
245
Denominative Nouns
250
Of the Plural
252
Of the Dual
255
The Genitive and the Construct State
258
Probable Remains of Early Caseendings
259
The Particles 99 General View
304
Adverbs
305
Prepositions
308
Prefixed Prepositions
309
Prepositions with Pronominal Suffixes and in the Plural Form
311
Conjunctions
316
Interjections
318
THIRD PAST SYNTAX
319
The Parts of Speech I Syntax of the Verb A Use of the Tenses and Moods 106 Use of the Perfect
320
Use of the Imperfect
325
Use of the Cohortative
331
Use of the Jussive
334
The Imperative
337
The Imperfect with Waw Consecutive
339
The Perfect with Waw Consecutive
344
B The Infinitive and Participle PAGE 113 The Infinitive Absolute
355
The Infinitive Construct
363
Construction of the Infinitive Construct with Subject and Object
369
The Participles
372
The Government of the Verb 117 The Direct Subordination of the Noun to the Verb as Accusative of the Object The Double Accusative
379
The Looser Subordination of the Accusative to the Verb
391
The Subordination of Nouns to the Verb by means of Prepositions
395
Verbal Ideas under the Government of a Verb Coordination of Complementary Verbal Ideas
404
Construction of Passive Verbs
407
Syntax of the Noun 122 Indication of the Gender of the Noun
409
The Representation of Plural Ideas by means of Collectives and by the Repetition of Words
414
The Various Uses of the Pluralform
417
Determination of Nouns in general Determination of Proper Names
421
Determination by means of the Article
424
The Noun determined by a following Determinate Genitive
431
The Indication of the Genitive Relation by means of the Construct State
434
Expression of the Genitive by Circumlocution
439
Wider Use of the Construct State
441
Apposition
443
Connexion of the Substantive with the Adjective
448
The Comparison of Adjectives Periphrastic expression of the Comparative and Superlative
450
Syntax of the Numerals
455
Syntax of the Pronoun 135 The Personal Pronoun
459
The Demonstrative Pronoun
464
The Interrogative Pronoun
466
The Sentence I The Sentence in General PAGE 140 Nounclauses Verbalclauses and the Compound Sentence
473
The Nounclause
474
The Verbalclause
478
The Compound Sentence
481
Peculiarities in the Representation of the Subject especially in the Verbalclause
483
Expression of Pronominal Ideas by means of Substantives 470
470
Agreement between the Members of a Sentence especially between Subject and Predicate in respect of Gender and Number 486
486
Construction of Compound Subjects 492
492
Incomplete Sentences 494
494
Special Kinds of Sentenoes 148 Exclamations 496
496
Sentences which express an Oath or Asseveration 497
497
Interrogative Sentences 498
498
Desiderative Sentences 501
501
Negative Sentences 503
503
Restrictive and Intensive Clauses 509
509
Relative Clauses
511
Circumstantial Clauses
515
Objectclauses
517
Causal Clauses
518
Conditional Sentences
519
Concessive Clauses
525
Comparative Clauses
526
Disjunctive Sentences
527
Temporal Clauses
528
Final Clauses
531
Consecutive Clauses
532
Additions and Corrections
534
Paradigms
535
Index of Subjects and of Hebrew Words
559
Index of Passages
567

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Page 532 - For he is not a man, as I am, that I should answer him, and we should come together in judgment. Neither is there any daysman betwixt us, that might lay his hand upon us both.
Page 448 - ... and I will remember my covenant, which is between me and you and every living creature of all flesh; and the waters shall no more become a flood to destroy all flesh. "And the bow shall be in the cloud; and I will look upon it, that I may remember the everlasting covenant between God and every living creature of all flesh that is upon the earth.
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