Films of the New French Extremity: Visceral Horror and National Identity

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McFarland, May 19, 2016 - Performing Arts - 216 pages
The films of the New French Extremity have been reviled by critics but adored by fans and filmmakers. Known for graphically brutal depictions of sex and violence, the subgenre emerged from the French art-house scene in the late 1990s and became a cult phenomenon, eventually merging into the horror genre where it became associated with American torture porn. Decidedly French in flavor, the films seek to reveal the dark side of French society. This book provides an in-depth study of New French Extremity, focusing on such films as Trouble Every Day (2001), Irreversible (2002), Twentynine Palms (2003), High Tension (2003) and Martyrs (2008). The author explores the social implications of cinematic cruelty presented not as "violent films" but as "films about violence."
 

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User Review  - titania86 - LibraryThing

The New French Extremity film movement has been popular for years because of its tendency to push the boundaries of cinema even beyond the horror genre. These films are typically nihilistic with ... Read full review

Contents

Foreword by Andrea Subissati
1
Introduction
5
1 Vive la Révolution Frances Bloody and Divided History
13
The Film Industry in France
32
Gaspar Noés Carne 1991 I Stand Alone 1998 and Irréversible 2002
45
Romance 1999 Pola X 1999 and Baisemoi 2000
56
Sombre 1998 and LHumanité 1999
70
Trouble Every Day 2001 and In My Skin 2002
81
Calvaire 2004 Sheitan 2006 and Frontiers 2007
124
Them 2006 and The Pack 2009
135
Martyrs 2008
147
Inside 2007
154
The Hills Have Eyes 2006 Mirrors 2008 The Eye 2008 and Maniac 2012
161
Conclusion
175
The Business of Violence An Interview with Colin Geddes
179
Chapter Notes
189

Criminal Lovers 1999 and Twentynine Palms 2003
93
Intimacy 2001 Demonlover 2002 and Ma Mère 2004
104
High Tension 2003
116

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About the author (2016)

Alexandra West has written about genre films for The Toronto Star, Rue Morgue Magazine and Offscreen Film Journal. In 2012, she co-founded the Faculty of Horror podcast, exploring the films’ analytical side. She lives in Toronto, Ontario.

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