Each Moment Is the Universe: Zen and the Way of Being Time

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Shambhala Publications, Dec 2, 2008 - Religion - 256 pages
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It’s easy to regard time as a commodity—we even speak of "saving" or "spending" it. We often regard it as an enemy, when we feel it slipping away before we’re ready for time to be up. The Zen view of time is radically different than that: time is not something separate from our life; rather, our life is time. Understand this, says Dainin Katagiri Roshi, and you can live fully and freely right where you are in each moment.

Katagiri bases his teaching on Being Time, a text by the most famous of all Zen masters, Eihei Dogen (1200–1253), to show that time is a creative, dynamic process that continuously produces the universe and everything in it—and that to understand this is to discover a gateway to freedom from the dissatisfactions of everyday life. He guides us in contemplating impermanence, the present moment, and the ungraspable nature of past and future. He discusses time as part of our inner being, made manifest through constant change in ourselves and our surroundings. And these ideas are by no means metaphysical abstractions: they can be directly perceived by any of us through meditation.

To learn more about the author, visit his website: www.mnzencenter.org
 

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Contents

The Naked Nature of Time
3
The Search for Meaning and Security
6
Taking Care of Expectation
13
Making Your Life Vividly Alive
18
Right Seeing of Buddha
27
The Root of Buddha Way
32
PROFOUND HUMAN DESIRE
37
Seeking Satisfaction within Constant Change
40
Best Time Best Place Best Person
128
The Flow of the Rhythm of Life
131
Changing the Structure of Time and Space
136
Commentary on an Excerpt from Dogens Zazenshin
140
How to Make Your Life Mature
159
The Circle of Nirvana
166
The True Meaning of Effort
169
CREATING THE FUTURE
173

Fundamental Suffering as Truth
47
Touching the Present Moment
52
Passage to Freedom
57
A Deep Sense of Human Value
63
TIMELESS FREEDOM
69
Time Space and Being
72
The Pivot of Nothingness
76
Real Time and Daily Life
80
Commentary on an Excerpt from Dogens BeingTime
83
Total Dynamic Working
105
Delusion and Suffering
109
Practice and Enlightenment
113
Living in Real Time
117
THE PRACTICE OF CREATIVE ACTION
125
Creating the Future
175
The Law of Causation
178
Individual and Notindividual Karma
182
Manifested and Unmanifested Karma
186
Karma and Causation
191
Turning a New Leaf
200
Freedom from Causation
207
Eternal Possibility
213
Living with Great Hope
217
Finding Time in Buddhas Dharma
224
Selected Bibliography
233
Index
235
About the Author
241
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About the author (2008)

Born in Osaka, Japan, in 1928, Dainin Katagiri was trained traditionally as a Zen teacher. He first came to the United States in 1963, to help with a Soto Zen Temple in Los Angeles. He later joined Shunryu Suzuki Roshi at the San Francisco Zen Center and taught there until Suzuki Roshi’s death in 1971. He was then invited to form a new Zen center in Minneapolis, which, in addition to a monastery in the countryside of Minnesota, he oversaw until his death in 1990. He left behind a legacy of recorded teachings and twelve Dharma heirs. Katagiri is the author of several books, including Returning to Silence and You Have to Say Something.

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