Divided Lives: American Women in the Twentieth Century

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Macmillan, 1992 - History - 291 pages
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Winner of the 1983 Fredrick Jackson Turner Award from the Organization of American Historians.

American women have made great strides in the last century to win personal autonomy, sexual freedom, economic independence, and legal rights. Yet the vast majority of them still assume the domestic burdens that leave men free to play their traditional public roles. Examining women's lives in the larger context of U.S. social and political history, Rosenburg shows how American traditions of federalism, racial and ethnic diversity, geographic mobility, and relative abundance have both aided and hindered women's strides toward equality.This lively and informed analysis of the leaders, goals, and setbacks of the women's stride towards equality. This informed analysis of the leaders, goals, and setbacks of the women's movement is a landmark study.
 

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DIVIDED LIVES: American Women in the Twentieth Century

User Review  - Jane Doe - Kirkus

A solid and well-written, if analytically unexceptional, overview of the complex experience of modern American women. Attempting to unify conflicting theoretical approaches to woman's experience ... Read full review

Contents

1900
3
190112
36
191229
63
192945
102
194561
138
196173
180
197391
220
Toward the Year 2000
245
BIBLIOGRAPHICAL ESSAY
257
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About the author (1992)

Rosalind Rosenburg, professor of history at Barnard College, is the author of Beyond Separate Sphers: Intellectual Roots of Modern Feminism.

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