Democracy in an Age of Corporate Colonization: Developments in Communication and the Politics of Everyday Life

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SUNY Press, Jan 1, 1992 - Social Science - 399 pages
According to Deetz, our obsolete understanding of communication processes and power relations prevents us from seeing the corporate domination of public decision making. For most people issues of democracy, representation, freedom of speech, and censorship pertain to the State and its relationship to individuals and groups, and are linked to occasional political processes rather than everyday life decisions. This work reclaims the politics of personal identity and experience within the work environment as a first step to a democratic form of public decision-making appropriate to the modern context.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
Corporate Colonization of the Life World
13
Communication and the Politics of Everyday Life
45
The Role of Communication Studies
65
The Historical Relation of Communication and Democracy
91
Language and the Politics of Experience
113
Participation as a Normative Ideal for Democracy and Communication
145
Systematically Distorted Communication and Discursive Closure
173
The Subject and Discourse of Managerialism
221
Disciplinary Power and Discursive Formations at Work
249
The Imaginary World of Work Reproblematizing the Obvious
289
Workplace Democracy as a Responsive Micropractice
331
Bibliography
353
Name Index
387
Subject Index
393
Copyright

The Rise of the Modern Corporate Form
199

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About the author (1992)

Stanley A. Deetz is Professor of Communication at Rutgers University. He is co-author of Managing Interpersonal Communication, and currently edits the Communication Yearbook series.

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