Delay Analysis in Construction Contracts

Front Cover
Wiley, Jan 26, 2009 - Technology & Engineering - 288 pages
0 Reviews
The most significant unanticipated costs on many construction projects are the financial impacts associated with delay and disruption to the works. Assessing these, and establishing a causal link from each delay event to its effect, contractual liability and the damages experienced as a direct result of each event, can be difficult and complex.

This book is a practical guide to the process of delay analysis and includes an in-depth review of the primary methods of delay analysis, together with the assumptions that underlie the precise calculations required in any quantitative delay analysis. The techniques discussed can be used on projects of any size, under all forms of construction contract, both domestic and international.

The authors discuss not only delay analysis techniques, but also their appropriateness under given circumstances, demonstrating how combined approaches may be applied where necessary. They also consider problematic issues including 'who owns the float', concurrent delay, early completion programmes, and disruption. The book, which is well illustrated, features practical worked examples and case studies demonstrating the techniques commonly used by experienced practitioners.

This is an invaluable resource to contractors, architects, engineers, surveyors, programmers and delay analysts, and will also be of interest to clients' professional advisors managing extension of time or delay claims, as well as construction lawyers who require a better understanding of the underlying assumptions on which many quantitative delay analyses are based.

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

About the author (2009)

Dr. P. John Keane, chairman of Keane Associates, has thirty years' experience in the construction industry and is also an experienced arbitrator.

Anthony F. Caletka, PE, CFCC, CCM, is a managing director at PricewaterhouseCoopers and has twenty four years' experience in project and construction management, particularly on large civil engineering projects. He has had extensive experience of construction arbitration, litigation and dispute review boards and was a member of the SCL Delay and Disruption Protocol drafting committee.

Bibliographic information