Children with Disabilities: Reading and Writing the Four-Blocks¨ Way, Grades 1 - 3: Reading and Writing the Four-Blocks Way

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Carson-Dellosa Publishing, Jan 1, 2007 - Education - 144 pages
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Meet the learning needs and preferences of all students using Children with Disabilities: Reading and Writing the Four-Blocks(R) Way for students in grades 1Ğ3. This 144-page book provides a glimpse into an inclusion special-education classroom that uses the Four-Blocks(R) Literacy Model. This wonderful collection of ideas, strategies, and resources includes information on Self-Selected Reading, Guided Reading, Writing, and Working with Words. It also includes strategies for reading and writing success in special-education classrooms, variations for students with disabilities, teacher's checklists, IEP goal suggestions, examples of assistive technology, and answers to commonly asked questions. The book supports the Four-Blocks(R) Literacy Model and provides a list of children's literature that can be used in lessons.
 

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Contents

We Write This Book?
6
Overview
13
Sample FourBlocks Day in a Special Education Classroom
30
SelfSelected Reading
41
Children Read and Conference with the Teacher
48
Reading and Writing the FourBocksWay CDlO4235 CarsonDellosa
92
Copyright

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About the author (2007)

David Koppenhaver is an associate professor of Language, Reading, and Exceptionalities at Appalachian State University and the cofounder of the Center for Literacy and Disability Studies at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill. He is a former language arts teacher with more than 25 years of experience teaching and studying struggling readers and writers. Karen Erickson is a former teacher of children with significant disabilities who has worked in self-contained special education and resource room settings. Karen is the director of the Center for Literacy and Disability Studies at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill. Along with David Koppenhaver, Karen has conducted research and provided staff development for more than a decade.

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