Changing Heaven: A Novel

Front Cover
David R. Godine Publisher, 1993 - Fiction - 258 pages
2 Reviews
"Building on the reputation she established so resonantly in her first novel, The Whirlpool, Jane Urquhart now takes the reader on a magical and daring voyage - one that leads from the English moors (where the memory of Emily Bronte is as dark as it is magical) to Venice and modern-day Toronto." "Changing Heaven tells the store of Ann, a young Bronte scholar, and of her doomed love affair with Arthur, an art historian obsessed with Tintoretto. Interwoven with this is the tragic, parallel tale of Arianna Ether, a turn-of the-century balloonist in love with the brooding Jeremy. These are no simple love stories: for as in the paintings of Tintoretto, light and shadow themselves become palpable forces; and as in the novels of Bronte, love and its storms (literal and figurative) take on transcendent meaning. Jane Urquhart masterfully blurs the lines between reality and memory, sequential time and imagined time, to produce a rich and powerful meditation on the act of artistic creation, the ways in which myths enter our lives, and the cyclical nature of love." "Changing Heaven is a deeply moving work, by an author who is willing to test not only the limits of the conventional novel, but also the sensibilities of the reader - a writer able to throw a bridge between past and present, heaven and earth, and to do it with breathtaking skill."--BOOK JACKET.Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - gypsysmom - LibraryThing

This was a quirky little book but enjoyable. As with all Urquhart's books the writing was lovely. Ann grew up in Toronto but her grandmother lived in a small town in rural Ontario. Ann's father was ... Read full review

Changing heaven: a novel

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

A curious blend of fantasy and romance, this second novel by Canadian author Urquhart ( The Whirlpool , LJ 4/15/90) clearly aims for magical realism. Ill-fated hot-air balloonist Arianna Esther (nee ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

Section 1
1
Section 2
5
Section 3
23
Section 4
29
Section 5
36
Section 6
44
Section 7
49
Section 8
57
Section 22
140
Section 23
145
Section 24
165
Section 25
170
Section 26
179
Section 27
189
Section 28
193
Section 29
195

Section 9
66
Section 10
77
Section 11
82
Section 12
85
Section 13
93
Section 14
94
Section 15
99
Section 16
108
Section 17
113
Section 18
123
Section 19
129
Section 20
131
Section 21
137
Section 30
202
Section 31
208
Section 32
212
Section 33
215
Section 34
223
Section 35
228
Section 36
231
Section 37
240
Section 38
256
Section 39
259
Section 40
261
Section 41
262
Copyright

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About the author (1993)

Jane Urquhart, Poet and novelist Jane Urquhart was born in a small northern Ontario mining community called Little Long Lac. She has been Writer-in-Residence at the University of Ottawa and Memorial University of Newfoundland. In 1997, she held the Presidential Writer-in-Residence Fellowship at the University of Toronto. Urquhart has published books of poetry whose titles include "I'm Walking in the Garden of His Imaginary Palace," "False Shuffles," and "The Little Flowers of Madame de Montespan." She has also written the novels "The Whirlpool," which was the first Canadian book to win France's Prix du Meilleur Livre Etranger (Best Foreign Book Award), "Changing Heaven," "Away," which won the 1994 Trillium Award, and "The Underpainter," which won the Governor General's Award in 1997. She has also written a collection of short fiction, "Storm Glass," and several articles and reviews. Urquhart has also received the Marian Engel Award, in 1994, for an outstanding body of prose written by a Canadian woman and was named to France's Order of Arts and Letters as a Chevalier in 1996. Her novel "Away" was also short-listed for the International IMPAC Dublin Literary Award, which is the world's largest literary prized for a single work of fiction, and in 1997, she was asked to serve on the jury for this award.

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