Butterflies of British Columbia: Including Western Alberta, Southern Yukon, the Alaska Panhandle, Washington, Northern Oregon, Northern Idaho, and Northwestern Montana

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UBC Press, Mar 15, 2001 - Nature - 414 pages
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Butterflies are found everywhere in British Columbia, from balcony planter boxes in the city to the vast, unexplored expanses of boreal forest and mountains across the north, and from coastal bogs and wild ocean shorelines to the deserts of the southern interior. The total known fauna of 187 species of butterflies in B.C. is by far the largest and most diverse in Canada. Butterflies of British Columbia summarizes all available information on the butterflies of B.C. The 187 species and 264 subspecies of butterflies known from B.C., as well as 9 additional hypothetical species, are discussed with descriptions of identifying features, immature stages, larval foodplants, biology and life history, range and habitat, and conservation status. In addition, descriptions are provided for 11 new subspecies. Each species treatment also contains maps of the northwestern North American distribution, colour photographs of adults of all species and subspecies, and flight season graphs. The book includes an extensive general introduction to the study of butterflies, containing chapters on the history of butterfly study in B.C., the post-glacial colonization of B.C. by butterflies, the effects of European colonization on the fauna, butterfly conservation, butterfly gardening, ecology, morphology, and biology. Butterflies of British Columbia provides butterfly watchers, naturalists, and biologists with an overview of the fascinating butterfly fauna of B.C. and adjacent areas. It can be used by naturalists to identify all the butterfly species and subspecies in B.C. and adjacent areas and includes a wide range of information about both butterflies in general and individual species. There is also much original information in the book that scientists will find invaluable, especially the description of 11 new subspecies and a complete reassessment of the taxonomy of the species.
 

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Contents

Introduction
9
The Study of Butterflies in British Columbia
17
Postglacial Origins of the Butterfly Fauna of British Columbia
23
Impact of Humans on the Butterfly Fauna of British Columbia
26
Conservation of Butterflies in British Columbia
31
Butterfly Gardens
41
Morphology of Immature and Adult Butterflies
46
Biology of Butterflies
51
Family Lycaenidae Gossamer Wings
188
Subfamily Lycaeninae Coppers
189
SubfamilyTheclinae Hairstreaks
199
Subfamily Polyommatinae Blues
223
Family Riodinidae Metalmarks
246
Family Nymphalidae Brushfoots
248
Subfamily Nymphalinae Anglewings
249
Subfamily Argynninae Fritillaries
271

Seasonal Changes in Butterfly Fauna
77
Species Accounts
81
Organization of the Species Accounts
83
Superfamily Hesperioidea Skippers
85
Family Hesperiidae Skippers
86
Subfamily Pyrginae Spreadwing Skippers
89
Subfamily Hesperiinae Grass Skippers
101
Superfamily Papilionoidea The Butterflies
119
Family Papilionidae Swallowtails and Apollos
120
Subfamily Parnassiinae Apollos
121
Subfamily Papilioninae Swallowtails
129
Family Pieridae Whites Marbles and Sulphurs
140
Subfamily Pierinae Whites
141
Subfamily Anthocharinae Marbles and Orangetips
159
Subfamily Coliadinae Sulphurs
167
Subfamily Melitaeinae Checkerspots
298
Subfamily Limenitidinae Admirals
313
Subfamily Satyrinae Satyrs
321
Subfamily Danainae Milkweed Butterflies
352
Appendices
355
Maps Showing the Distribution of Additional Species in Areas Adjacent to British Columbia
357
Species Checklist
363
Data for Butterfly Photographs and Genitalia Drawings
369
The Lepidopterists Societys Statement on Collecting Lepidoptera
379
Glossary
381
Bibliography
385
Credits
401
Index
403
Copyright

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About the author (2001)

Crispin S. Guppy is a wildlife habitat biologist and entomologist who lives in Quesnel, B.C. Jon H. Shepard is a biodiversity consultant and entomologist living in Nelson, B.C. Both have had a lifelong interest in the study of butterflies and have published extensively in the field.

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