Building the New World: Studies in the Modern Architecture of Latin America, 1930-1960

Front Cover
Verso, 2000 - Architecture - 280 pages
1 Review
The period between 1930 and 1960 in particular saw a dramatic upsurge in Latin American modern architecture as the various governments strove to make public their modernising intentions. After 1960, however, the year in which Brasilia was inaugurated, economic growth in the region slowed and the modernist project faltered. The English-speaking world, which had previously admired Latin American buildings, began to write them out of the history of twentieth-century architecture. Building the New World attempts to redress the balance. It surveys the most important examples of state-funded modernism in Latin America during a period of almost unimaginable optimism, when politicians and architects such as Pani, Costa, Reidy and Niemeyer sought ways, literally, to build their societies out of underdevelopment.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

hi

Contents

The Modern Movement in architecture and urbanism
3
The USA and Latin American modern architecture I I
11
MEXICO
22
VENEZUELA
87
The Ciudad Universitaria
124
urban integration
140
The origins of modernism in Brazil
164
The evolution of modern architecture in Rio
180
Cidade Universitaria
200
The origins of BrasIlia
215
Failure and success of BrasIlia
240
NOTES
256
SELECT BIBLIOGRAPHY
274
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (2000)

Valerie Fraser is a Reader in the Department of Art History and Theory at the University of Essex. Her books include Building the New World, The Architecture of Conquest, and, with Oriana Baddeley, Drawing the Line.

Bibliographic information