Brand Failures: The Truth about the 100 Biggest Branding Mistakes of All Time

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Kogan Page, May 28, 2003 - Business & Economics - 310 pages
It's not just smaller, lesser-known companies that have launched dud brands. On the contrary, most of the world's global giants have launched new products that have flopped - spectacularly and at great cost. Haig organizes these 100 "failures" into ten types which include classic failures (e.g., New Coke), idea failures (e.g., R.J.Reynolds' smokeless cigarettes), extension failures (e.g. Harley Davidson perfume), culture failures (e.g., Kellogs in India), and technology failures (e.g., Pets.com).

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User Review  - phoenixcomet - LibraryThing

I actually found Brand Failures to be more interesting than Brand Successes. Sometimes why things fail seems to make no sense whatsoever. Matt Haig does a good job of briefly discussing the reason why a particular brand, particularly an old and venerated brand may fail. Read full review

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About the author (2003)

Matt Haig was born on July 3, 1975 in Sheffield. He attended the University of Hull where he studied English and History. He has since become a British novelist and journalist. He has authored both fiction and non-fiction for children and adults. His non-fiction title "Reasns to Stay Alive" became a Sunday Times bestseller. His bestselling children's novel, A Boy Called Christrmas is now being adapted for film. His other works include: The Last Family in England, The Dead Fathers Club, Shadow Forest, The Possession of Mr. Cave, How to Stop Time and Runaway Troll.

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