Braiding Histories: Learning from Aboriginal Peoples’ Experiences and Perspectives

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UBC Press, May 1, 2009 - Education - 252 pages

This book proposes a new pedagogy for addressing Aboriginal subject material, shifting the focus from an essentializing or “othering” exploration of the attributes of Aboriginal peoples to a focus on historical experiences that inform our understanding of contemporary relationships between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal peoples.

Reflecting on the process of writing a series of stories, Dion takes up questions of (re)presenting the lived experiences of Aboriginal people in the service of pedagogy. Investigating what happened when the stories were taken up in history classrooms, she illustrates how our investments in particular identities structure how we hear and what we are “willing to know.”

Braiding Histories illuminates the challenges of speaking/listening and writing/reading across cultural boundaries as an Aboriginal person to communicate Aboriginal experience through education. It will be useful to teachers and students of educational and Native studies and will appeal to readers seeking a better understanding of colonialism and Aboriginal--non-Aboriginal relations.

 

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Contents

1 Historical Amnesia and the Discourse of the Romantic Mythical Other
3
2 Listen Again and Ill Retell You a Story
14
3 Listening But What Is Being Heard?
56
4 The Braiding Histories Project
77
Teaching and Learning from Shanawdithits Story
105
Teaching and Learning from Audreys Story
137
7 Disrupting Moulded Images
177
The Braiding Histories Stories as Distributed for Classroom Use
192
Initial Teacher Interview Questions
205
PlanningSession Agendas and Discussion Questions
206
Notes
209
References
213
Index
219
Copyright

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About the author (2009)

Susan D. Dion is a professor in the Faculty of Education at York University.

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