Aztec Warfare: Imperial Expansion and Political Control

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University of Oklahoma Press, 1988 - History - 404 pages
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In exploring the pattern and methods of Aztec expansion, Ross Hassig focuses on political and economic factors. Because they lacked numerical superiority, faced logistical problems presented by the terrain, and competed with agriculture for manpower, the Aztecs relied as much on threats and the image of power as on military might to subdue enemies and hold them in their orbit. Hassig describes the role of war in the everyday life of the capital, Tenochtitlan: the place of the military in Aztec society; the education and training of young warriors; the organization of the army; the use of weapons and armor; and the nature of combat.

 

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Amazing book really helpful and interesting to read. So many facts that made me more intrigued about the topic.

Contents

Introduction
3
Part One War in Aztec Life
15
The Political Bases of Aztec Warfare
17
The Military Life Cycle
27
Declaration Preparation and Mobilization
48
The March and the Encampment
63
Arms and Armor
75
Combat
95
Moteuczomah Ilhuicamina
157
Axayacatl
176
Tizoc
189
Ahuitzotl
200
Moteuczomah Xocoyotl
219
The Spanish Conquest
236
Conclusion
251
Glossary
269

Victory or Defeat and Its Aftermath
110
Part Two The History of Aztec Expansion
123
The Preimperial Kings
125
Itzcoatl
141
Notes
273
References
361
Index
383
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About the author (1988)

Ross Hassig , a historical anthropologist specializing in Mesoamerica, is the author of Time, History, and Belief in Aztec and Colonial Mexico; Aztec Warfare: Imperial Expansion and Political Control; and Trade, Tribute, and Transportation: The Sixteenth-Century Political Economy of the Valley of Mexico.

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