Ascension and Ecclesia: On the Significance of the Doctrine of the Ascension for Ecclesiology and Christian Cosmology

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Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing, 1999 - Religion - 356 pages
Recent theology offers few attempts to come to grips with the meaning and implications of the ascension of Jesus. Ascension and Ecclesia promises to refocus attention on this crucial Christian doctrine. Farrow begins with a discussion of the biblical treatment of the ascension and eucharistic celebration, from which emerges a unique ecclesial worldview. Succeeding chapters explore the link between the ascension, cosmology, and ecclesiology and examine the difficulties faced by the doctrine of ascension in our modern scientific world.
 

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User Review  - douglashknight - LibraryThing

This book is the first major treatise on the subject since the 19th century, and the first ever to explore its relation to the history of ideas. Described by Professor Ellen Charry of Princeton ... Read full review

Contents

Thinking about the Church
1
Two Histories
7
The Ascension as Story and Metaphor
15
A Lukan Artifice?
16
The Larger Story
22
Breaking Boundaries
29
The Masters Metaphor
38
Cosmologies and Ecclesiologies I
41
East
131
West
152
Where is Jesus?
165
An Unresolved Question
172
Discourse on the Dead Christ
180
Return of the Cosmic Christ
191
This Same Jesus
222
Church at the Crossroads
255

Preserving the Tension
43
Eucharistic Ecclesiology
66
One Step Forward
81
Cosmologies and Ecclesiologies II
87
Two Steps Back
89
Augustine
106
Dualist Ecclesiology
129
In the Shadow of Sinai
256
Ecce Homo
267
Biblical Resources
275
Exaltation and Preexistence
281
A Bibliography of Works Cited
299
Index of Names
325
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Page 15 - In my vision at night I looked, and there before me was one like a son of man, coming with the clouds of heaven.
Page 5 - But Sunday is the day on which we all hold our common assembly, because it is the first day on which God, having wrought a change in the darkness and matter, made the world; and Jesus Christ our Savior on the same day rose from the dead.
Page 4 - And on the day called Sunday, all who live in cities or in the country gather together to one place, and the memoirs of the apostles or the writings of the prophets are read, as long as time permits; then, when the reader has ceased, the overseer verbally instructs, and exhorts to the imitation of these good things.

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