Africanity Redefined, Volume 1

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Africa World Press, 2002 - Social Science - 225 pages
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The first in a three volume set of Mazrui's most important essays, this volume redefines the meaning of Africanity across geographical space, time and cultures. The resulting definition forces us to reject neo-imperialist paradigms and ontologies of what it means to be African. By encouraging us to think about Africanity as an idea rather than as point of origin, the ideas contained in these essays force us to reposition ourselves in the debate of our place in global cultures and civilisations, and prepare us to take an active role in social and political affairs.
 

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Contents

THE MULTICULTURAL PARADIGM
3
The Study of Africa Genesis Substance
11
Afrocentricity versus Multiculturalism
21
Who are the Africans? Identity in Search of Unity
37
On the Concept of We Are All Africans
43
The Bondage of Boundaries Towards Redefining
65
Towards Abolishing the Red Sea
79
Afrabia Africa and Arabs in the
87
The Split Soul of a Continent
117
The Triple Heritage of the State in Africa
131
Africa Entrapped Between the Protestant Ethic
147
Africa Gender Roles in Transition
161
Technology Transfer in the Computer
169
The Muse of Modernity and the Quest
199
Index
217
Copyright

Africas Triple Heritage
99

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About the author (2002)

Ricardo Rene Laremont is the Associate Director of the Institute of Global Cultural Studies and has joint faculty appointments in the Sociology, Political Science, & Africana Studies Departments at the State University of New York at Binghamton. His work focuses on the comparative politics of Africa, Latin America, and Europe. His publications include Islam and the Politics of Resistance in Algeria, 1783-1992, The Causes of War and the Consequences of Peacekeeping in Africa, and a forthcoming book, Borders, Battles, and Blood: Colonial Boundaries, Warfare, and the New Nationalisms in Africa.