A History of the British Army, Volume 3

Front Cover
Macmillan and Company, limited, 1902 - Great Britain
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

The Pay of the Men insufficient
41
The Quebec Act
47
Battle of Seerpore
53
Battle of Beerpore
61
Recapture of the City by Meer Cossims Troops
66
Meer Cossim retires to Sooty
72
Adams resumes his Advance
79
Mutiny in the British Force
85
Shuja Dowlah retreats to Buxar
92
Battle of Buxar 96102
101
Shuja Dowlah surrenders
104
Schemes of Mohammed Ali
110
Action at Changama
116
Plan of the Madras Council for a new Campaign
122
Smith recalled to Madras
129
The Mahrattas invade Mysore
135
Bombay Aggressive Policy of the Council
141
Follies of the Indian Councils
147
The Colonists take the Offensive Capture of Ticonderoga
153
Heavy Losses of the British
159
Washington chosen CommanderinChief of the Americans
161
False Basis on which the British Operations were planned
168
Howes Preference for a sounder Plan
174
Carleton closes the Campaign without taking Ticonderoga
180
Washington is allowed to escape
186
His subsequent Inactivity
188
Pursuit of the Americans to the Delaware
194
He outmanoeuvres Cornwallis
200
Disastrous Confusion of Germaines Orders
207
Noflint Grey
217
Munro reinforces Baillie 436
221
CHAPTER XI
223
Pursuit of the Americans Action at Huberton
225
Critical Situation of Burgoyne
231
Burgoynes second Attack on the American Position
237
Summary of the Campaign
243
Revision of former Plans against America
249
Arrival of the French Fleet under dEstaing off the American
255
Washingtons Difficulties with French Officers
257
Bouille seizes Dominica
263
CHAPTER XIV
270
He retreats from before Charleston
276
Continued Mismanagement of Germaine
280
CHAPTER XV
287
Capture of Fort St Juan
339
Siege of Gibraltar
345
Leeward Sphere Treachery of Jamaica Planters
351
Greene succeeds Gates in Command of the Americans 358
358
Cornwallis still persists in his Advance
364
Cornwallis retires to Wilmington
375
Retreat of Rawdon Capture of several English Posts
381
Cornwallis joins Forces with General Phillips in Virginia
387
Cornwallis fortifies Gloucester and Yorktown
391
The American Revolution on the eve of Collapse at the Time
398
Benedict Arnolds inborn Military Genius
404
The whole Situation changed by Rodneys Victory of
409
The grand Attack on Gibraltar
415
CHAPTER XXII
421
Colonel Egertons Campaign 42 5
429
Tippo0 Sahib attacks Baillies Detachment 437
434
His Blunders 441
441
His first Operations
447
Relief of Wandewash 455
455
Relief of Vellore
461
First two Engagements between Hughes and Suffren
467
Interference of Lord Macartney with Coote
468
Death of Coote
474
Edmund Burkes Libel on his Army
482
His Preparations to invade Mysore
488
England Lord Rockinghams Administration
493
Shelburnes Folly in dealing with the Reduction of the Military
499
Peace with Tippoo Sahib signed 4 89
500
British Quarrel with Spain over Nootka Sound
506
Reforms instituted in consequence
514
The Soldier starved by excessive Stoppages
520
Neglect of the Militia
523
Tendency to carry their Teaching too far 53
531
The Cavalry Increase of the Light Dragoons 537
537
The Attacks on Warren Hastings
543
Cornwallis thwarted by the Madras Council
550
Opening of the Campaign by General Medows in the South
551
His Junction with Medows 557
557
His Advance upon Bangalore
564
Preparations for Advance on Scringapatam
570
Siege and Storm of Savan Droog 580582
580
The Army encamps before Seringapatam
586
Siege of the Fort of Seringapatam
597
He forms an Alliance with Nizam Ali and the Mahrattas
608

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 28 - I rejoice that America has resisted. Three millions of people so dead to all the feelings of liberty, as voluntarily to let themselves be made slaves, would have been fit instruments to make slaves of all the rest.
Page 240 - This unfortunate event, it is to be hoped, will in future prevent ministers from pretending to direct operations of war in a country at three thousand miles distance, of which they have so little knowledge as not to be able to distinguish between good, bad, or interested advices, or to give positive orders...
Page 175 - In a letter to Reed he disburdened his heart more completely. " Such dearth of public spirit, and such want of virtue ; such stock -jobbing, and fertility in all the low arts to obtain advantage of one kind or another in this great change of military arrangement, I never saw before, and I pray God's mercy that I may never be witness to again.
Page 176 - Could I have foreseen what I have experienced and am likely to experience, no consideration upon earth should have induced me to accept this command.
Page 400 - The man was of course shallow, fickle, unprincipled, and unstable in character, but he possessed all the gifts of a great commander. To boundless energy and enterprise he united quick insight into a situation, sound strategic instinct, audacity of movement, wealth of resource, a swift and unerring eye in action, great personal daring, and true magic of leadership.
Page 527 - Their manoeuvres were such as the worst General in England would be hooted at for practising; two lines coming up within six yards of one another, and firing in one another's faces till they had no ammunition left : nothing could be more ridiculous.
Page 284 - If I were to be called upon to draw a picture of the times and of men, from what I have seen, heard, and in part know, I should in one word say, that idleness, dissipation, and extravagance seem to have laid fast hold of most of them; that speculation, peculation, and an insatiable thirst for riches seem to have got the better of every other consideration, and almost of every order of men...
Page 167 - America as it now stands, it is impossible to conquer it with our British Army. ... To attempt to conquer it by our land force is as wild an idea as ever controverted common sense.
Page 278 - ... or interested suggestions of people, who cannot be competent judges of the subject, and puzzle me by hinting wishes, with which I cannot agree, and yet am loath to disregard? For God's sake, my Lord, if you wish that I should do any thing, leave me to myself, and let me adapt my efforts to the hourly change of circumstances, and take the risk of my want of success.
Page 234 - The dispatch was as follows: uNbUs y void [Here we are], and nothing between us and Gates. I sincerely hope this little success of ours will facilitate your operations.

Bibliographic information