A Language of Our Own: The Genesis of Michif, the Mixed Cree-French Language of the Canadian M?tis

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Oxford University Press, Jun 5, 1997 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 336 pages
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The Michif language -- spoken by descendants of French Canadian fur traders and Cree Indians in western Canada -- is considered an "impossible language" since it uses French for nouns and Cree for verbs, and comprises two different sets of grammatical rules. Bakker uses historical research and fieldwork data to present the first detailed analysis of this language and how it came into being.
 

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Contents

1 Introduction
3
2 EuropeanAmerindian Contact in the Fur Trade
28
Origin and Culture
52
4 Grammatical Sketch of Michif
78
5 Variation in Michif
118
Types and Origin
161
A Model
192
8 The Intertwining of French and Cree
214
French Cree and Ojibwe
248
10 The Genesis of Michif
277
Notes
281
References
287
Index of Languages Personal Names and Geographical Names
305
Subject Index
312
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Page 295 - HOWSE. — A GRAMMAR OF THE CREE LANGUAGE. With which is combined an analysis of the Chippeway Dialect. By Joseph Howse, FRGS 8vo, pp.
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