A Brief History of Medicine: From Hippocrates to Gene Therapy

Front Cover
Robinson, 2005 - Medicine - 414 pages
The foundations for the scientific study of the body and modern Western medicine as we know it started with William Harvey's discovery of the circulatory system in the early 17th century. But its roots stretch back as far as ancient Greece, when medicine first departed from the divine and the mystical and moved toward observation and logic. Its early development was slow, constrained by the taboo around dissection (only external symptoms could be used for diagnosis), as well as superstition and mysticism (illness was the work of demons and pixies and curable only by penitence). Paul Strathern steers us skillfully through the maze of discoveries, diseases, and wrong turns that have made medicine what it is today--super efficient, high tech, and increasingly costly. "A Brief History of Medicine" offers an accessible history of the arguments, missteps, and dumb luck that led to the world's most important medical breakthroughs--from anatomy, grave robbing, the plague, and germ theory to vaccination, quackery, microorganisms, and penicillin.

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Contents

First Light
1
A Tradition is Born
22
Figures in a Dark Landscape
38
Copyright

16 other sections not shown

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About the author (2005)

Paul Strathern was born in London in 1940. He studied physics, chemistry and maths at Trinity College, Dublin, before switching to philosophy. He is the author of several novels, including A Season in Abbyssinia, which won a Somerset Maugham prize, and two highly successful series of short introductory books, Philosophers in 90 Minutes and The Big Idea: Scientists Who Changed the World. His most recent books include Mendeleyev's Dream, which was shortlisted for the Aventis Science Book Prize in 2001, Dr. Strangelove's Game: A History of Economic Genius and The Medici: Godfathers of the Renaissance.

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