The Dublin university magazine (Google eBook)

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Page 13 - ... their quiet contrast with the transitional character of all things, in the strength which, through the lapse of seasons and times, and the decline and birth of dynasties, and the changing of the face of the earth, and of the limits of the sea, maintains its sculptured shapeliness for a time insuperable, connects forgotten and following ages with each other, and half constitutes the identity, as it concentrates the sympathy, of nations ; it is in that golden stain of time, that we are to look...
Page 620 - ... sore all over his feet, that he could scarce stir. Yet he was forced to run away from a miller and other company, that took them for rogues. His sitting at table at one place, where the master of the house, that had not seen him in eight years, did know him, but kept it private ; when at the same table there was one that had been of his own regiment at Worcester, could not know him, but made him drink the King's health, and "said that the King was at least four fingers higher than he.
Page 13 - ... that we are to look for the real light, and colour, and preciousness of architecture ; and it is not until a building has assumed this character, till it has been entrusted with the fame, and hallowed by the deeds of men, till its walls have been witnesses of suffering, and its pillars rise out of the shadows of death, that its existence, more lasting as it is than that of the natural objects of the world around it, can be gifted with even so much as these possess of language and of life.
Page 617 - In Cheapside there was a great many bonfires, and Bow bells and all the bells in all the churches as we went home were a-ringing. Hence we went homewards, it being about ten at night. But the common joy that was every where to be seen ! The number of bonfires, there being fourteen between St.
Page 319 - Be it therefore enacted by the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty, by and with the advice and consent of the Legislative Council and of the Legislative Assembly of the Province of Canada, constituted and assembled by virtue of and under the authority of an Act passed in the Parliament of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland and intituled "An Act to Re-unite the Provinces of Upper and Lower Canada, and for the Government of Canada...
Page 13 - ... of stern watching, of mysterious sympathy, nay, even of approval or condemnation, which we feel in walls that have long been washed by the passing waves of humanity. It is in their lasting witness against men, in their quiet contrast with the transitional character of all things, in the strength which, through the lapse of seasons and times, and the decline and birth of dynasties, and the changing of the face of the earth, and of the limits of the sea, maintains its sculptured shapeliness for...
Page 307 - cry the sailors ; " land ! land ! " he awakes, He runs, yes ! behold it ! it blesseth his sight, The land ! O, dear spectacle ! transport ! delight ! O, generous sobs, which he cannot restrain ! What will Ferdinand say ? and the Future ? and Spain ? He will lay this fair land at the foot of the Throne, His King will repay all the ills he has known, In exchange for a world what are honors and gains ? Or a crown ? But how is he rewarded ? with chains ! 4.
Page 620 - At Rouen he looked so poorly, that the people went into the rooms before he went away to see whether he had not stole something or other.
Page 305 - The rudder which creaks mid the billowy roar ; He hears the hoarse moan of the spray-driving blast, And its funeral wail through the shrouds of the mast. The stars of far Europe have sunk from the skies, And the great Southern Cross meets his terrified eyes; But, at length, the slow dawn, softly streaking the night, Illumes the blue...
Page 295 - He read a few sentences to the heathen ; and, after some conversation with them, he gave them an account of the creation of the world, the fall of man, and his redemption by Christ.

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