Mediation and Arbitration of Employment Disputes

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Wiley, Sep 12, 1997 - Business & Economics - 223 pages
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A Guide for Policy and Practice

This book offers a road map to dramatically reduce workplace conflict and legal costs. ADR is a revolutionary trAnd that offers the potential for resolving disputes in a fair and reasonable manner, at tremAndous savings to everyone involved. On behalf of consumers, businesses, and ordinary Americans trapped in a liability logjam, bravo Dunlop and Zack!
--Jerry J. Jasinowski, president, National Association of Manufacturers

For many employers and employees alike, alternative dispute resolution (ADR) offers clear advantage over recourse to a legal system compromised by staggering case loads, Andless appeals, and high litigation costs. Indeed, ADR may prove the best hope for the equitable, affordable, and expeditious adjudication of employment dispute claims. Now, two of the people most responsible for the adoption of due process arbitration standards--standards that finally gave ADR real teeth--take a comprehensive look at due process arbitration in practice and offer policy guidelines, as well as an action plan for establishing mediation and arbitration as the cornerstones of any dispute resolution system.

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About the author (1997)

JOHN T. DUNLOP is Lamont University Professor Emeritus at Harvard University, where he also served as chairman of the Department of Economics and dean of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences. His career includes appointments as director of the Cost of Living Council, Secretary of Labor, chair of the Pay Advisory Committee and chair of the Commission on the Future of Worker-Management Relations (the ?Dunlop Commission?). Dunlop has published numerous books on economics, industrial relations, and dispute resolution. ARNOLD M. ZACK is a full-time arbitrator and mediator of labor-management disputes and former president of the National Academy of Arbitrators. An initiator of the Protocol, Zack has been teaching alternative dispute resolution at Yale Law School and at the Harvard Trade Union Program. Since 1993, he has served as the chairman of Bermuda's Essential Industries Dispute Settlement Board and has helped develop dispute settlement machinery in a number of countries including Australia, Greece, South Africa, and Spain. He also has published a number of works on arbitration, mediation, and other labor issues.

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