Flashman: From the Flashman Papers, 1839-1842

Front Cover
George MacDonald Fraser
Penguin, 1969 - Fiction - 256 pages
27 Reviews
Brigadier-General Sir Harry Paget Flashman is a fictional character based upon the character "Flashman" (a bully) in "Tom Brown's Schooldays." Expelled from Rugby for drunkenness, and none too welcome at home after seducing his father's mistress, the young anti-hero embarks on a military career with Lord Cardigan's Hussars. After marrying below his station, Flashman is forced to resign, but given another option: to make his reputation in India. By showing off his language and riding skills in India, Flashman is given still another assignment: to the worst frontier of the British Empire at that time, Afghanistan. En route to Afghanistan, he hones his skills as a soldier, duelist, imposter, coward and amorist before being pressed into reluctant service as a secret agency. His Afghan adventures include the retreat from Kabul, Last Stand at Gandamak and the Siege of Jalalabad, in the First Anglo-Afghan War. Despite being captured, tortured, and escaping death numerous times, and hiding and shirking his duty as much as possible, he comes through it all alive and with a hero's reputation.
  

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Review: Flashman (Flashman Papers #1)

User Review  - Simon - Goodreads

Sexually incontinent, self-centred, spineless and shameless - what's not to like about Harry Flashman, George McDonald Fraser's timeless comic character? This is the first book, originally published ... Read full review

Review: Flashman (Flashman Papers #1)

User Review  - Keith Thompson - Goodreads

People are always asking authors, "Where do you get your ideas?" The answer is, "We steal from those who have gone before us." My novel "Scoundrel!: The Secret Memoirs of General James Wilkinson" grew ... Read full review

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Contents

Section 1
10
Section 2
11
Section 3
16
Section 4
28
Section 5
48
Section 6
64
Section 7
76
Section 8
98
Section 10
129
Section 11
161
Section 12
183
Section 13
216
Section 14
230
Section 15
253
Section 16
256
Copyright

Section 9
117

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References to this book

About the author (1969)

Author George MacDonald Fraser was born April 2, 1925 in Carlisle. He was refused entrance to the medical faculty of Glasgow University, so he joined the army in 1943. He served as an infantryman with the 17th Indian Division of the XIVth Army in Burma, a lance corporal and was commissioned in the Gordon Highlanders. After the war, he became a sports reporter with the Carlisle Journal; and during this time, he met and married Kathleen Hetherington, a reporter from another paper. He worked as a reporter and sub-editor on the Cumberland News and then moved to Glasgow, in 1953, where he worked at the Glasgow Herald as a features editor and deputy editor. Fraser's first novel was "Flashman" (1969), which was followed by nine sequels, so far, that deal with different venues of the 19th century ranging from Russia, Borneo and China to the Great Plains of the America West. Some of the other titles in the Flashman Papers are "Royal Flash" (1970), "Flashman in the Great Game" (1975), "Flashman and the Redskins" (1982), and "Flashman and the Angel of the Lord" (1994). Some of his non-fiction work includes "The Steel Bonnets" (1971), which is a factual study of the Anglo-Scottish border thieves in the seventeenth century, and "Quartered Safe Out Here" (1992). Fraser has also written a number of screenplays that include "The Three Musketeers" (1973), "Royal Flash" (1975), "Octopussy" (1983), and "Return of the Musketeers" (1989). He has also written a series of short stories about Private McAuslan whose titles include "The General Danced at Dawn" (1970), "McAuslan in the Rough" (1974), and "The Sheik and the Dustbin and other McAuslan Stories" (1988). He died of cancer on January 2, 2008.

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