Sketch of the political career of the Earl of Durham (Google eBook)

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J. Reid, 1835 - Great Britain - 400 pages
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Page 215 - ... consists of representatives chosen by the people, that in tract of time this representation becomes very unequal and disproportionate to the reasons it was at first established upon.
Page 216 - Salus populi suprema lex is certainly so just and fundamental a rule, that he who sincerely follows it cannot dangerously err. If, therefore, the executive who has the power of convoking the legislative, observing rather the true proportion than fashion of representation, regulates not by old custom, but true reason, the number of members in all places, that have a right to be distinctly represented, which no part of the people, however incorporated, can pretend to, but in proportion to...
Page 187 - ... queried. It appeared from the defence made by the officer, that a majority of the freemen of that borough had formed themselves into a society, under the name of the Christian Club...
Page 112 - Whereas by the ancient laws and statutes of this kingdom frequent Parliaments ought to be held, and whereas frequent and new Parliaments tend very much to the happy union and good agreement of the king and people...
Page 367 - to challenge me to meet him in the House of Lords. I know well the meaning of the taunt. He is aware of his infinite superiority over me in one respect ; and so am I. He is a practised orator, and a powerful debater. I am not. I speak but seldom in parliament, and always with reluctance in an assembly where I meet with no sympathy from an unwilling majority. He knows full well the advantage...
Page 389 - ... of common right, all the inhabitants, householders, and residents within the borough, ought to have voice in the election, and not the freeholders there only'. In the case of Boston (1628) the committee asserted that the election of burgesses, in all boroughs, did, of common right, belong to the commoners ; and that nothing could take it from them but a prescription, and 'a constant usage beyond all memory'.7 In addition...
Page 154 - ... incalculable addition of force. That Government which has nothing to disguise, wields the most powerful instrument that can appertain to sovereign rule. It carries with it the united reliance and effort of the whole mass of the governed ; and let the triumph of our beloved country, in its awful contest with tyrant-ridden France, speak the value of a spirit to be found only in men accustomed to indulge and express their honest sentiments.
Page 116 - England, by people dwelling and resident in the same counties, whereof every one of them shall have free land or tenement to the value of forty shillings by the year at the least above all charges...
Page 131 - ... treason and disaffection but rather a security for submission and tranquillity. It was on the latter principle, I imagine, that our ancestors acted, when they granted the solicitations of the inhabitants of Wales, Chester, and Durham, and recorded in the most solemn manner on the Statute Book, their conviction that, affording large classes of the community an interest in the Constitution, was the best, and wisest, and safest mode of providing for its wellbeing and permanency. The system pursued...
Page 212 - ... this transaction, and to exhibit the conduct of the Senate fairly to the public view. I owe this duty to the Senate. I owe it to the committee with which I am connected ; and although whatever is personal to an individual is generally of too little importance to be made the subject of much remark, I hope I may be permitted to say a few words in defence of my own reputation, in reference to a matter which has been greatly misrepresented. This vote for the three millions was proposed by the House...

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