Ethnoregional Conflict in Democracies: Mostly Ballots, Rarely Bullets

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Greenwood Publishing Group, Jan 1, 1996 - Political Science - 279 pages
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Most advanced industrial democracies have been successful in controlling ethnic political conflicts peacefully. This book examines ethnoregional conflicts in seven ethnoregions--in Scotland, Flanders, Wallonia, Brussels, Quebec, Northern Ireland, and the Basque region of Spain--to explain what mactors determine electoral support for ethnoregional parties, why in some cases electoral conflict has co-existed with ethnic violence, and why there appears to be an inverse relationship between electoral success and policy success among many ethnoregional parties. As ethnic conflicts--peaceful and violent--continue to rage around the world, this important new study merits the attention of scholars and students in comparative politics and ethnic studies.
  

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Contents

Ethnoregional Politics in Democracies
1
The Scottish National Party Ethnic Politics and Class Conflict
23
Belgium Ethnic Conflict and Elite Accommodation
57
The Parti Quebecois Electoral Success and Policy Failure in a Hybrid System
107
Northern Ireland Ethnic Violence in a Democracy
147
The Basque Country Ballots and Bullets in a Democratizing State
175
Ethnic Conflict and Political Order
211
Appendix
245
Select Bibliography
249
Index
269
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About the author (1996)

SAUL NEWMAN is Associate Professor of Government at American University.

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