Just Food: Where Locavores Get It Wrong and How We Can Truly Eat Responsibly

Front Cover
Little, Brown, Aug 26, 2009 - Social Science - 272 pages
25 Reviews
We suffer today from food anxiety, bombarded as we are with confusing messages about how to eat an ethical diet. Should we eat locally? Is organic really better for the environment? Can genetically modified foods be good for you?

JUST FOOD does for fresh food what Fast Food Nation (Houghton Mifflin, 2001) did for fast food, challenging conventional views, and cutting through layers of myth and misinformation. For instance, an imported tomato is more energy-efficient than a local greenhouse-grown tomato. And farm-raised freshwater fish may soon be the most sustainable source of protein.

Informative and surprising, JUST FOOD tells us how to decide what to eat, and how our choices can help save the planet and feed the world.
  

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Review: Just Food: Where Locavores Get It Wrong and How We Can Truly Eat Responsibly

User Review  - Sally - Goodreads

Well researched and thought out, but quite dry. Feels like studying or reading someone else's dissertation, making it less accessible and therefore less effective. Read full review

Review: Just Food: Where Locavores Get It Wrong and How We Can Truly Eat Responsibly

User Review  - Josh - Goodreads

Want to eat local to help the environment? Your efforts are gallant, but ultimately they are wrong. This is the message Mr. McWilliams succeeds in conveying. I've never really cared one way or the ... Read full review

Contents

From the Golden Age to the Golden Mean of Food Production
1
1500 Miles
LCAs
Local Agriculture as a Means of Political Opposition
Buy Local
Scaling UpDown
Hub and Spoke
Land
Water
Grassfed Freerange and Other SoCalled Solutions
Another Compromise
5
Protein That Floats Above the Competition
Polycultures Potential
Old Harbingers of a New Revolution

2
Doing the Math
Chemicals
Soil and Cycles
Fertilizer Efficiency
The Golden Mean
3
Keeping Biotechnology in Perspective
Reducing Pesticides
Reduced Tillage
Glyphosate
Yields
Biodiversity
The Case of Africa
Coda
4
General Perspectives
Air
Aquacultures False Start?
A FiveGallon Bucket and a Pickup Truck
Fish Without Ponds + Vegetables Without Soil the Future
6
Subsidized Insanity
Externalities
The Environmental Justice of Trade
Food Miles
The Golden Mean
Beyond Organic and Conventional
A Judicious Use of Chemicals
Reduced Tillage
Integrating Livestock and Plant Crops
Notes
Acknowledgments
About the Author
Copyright

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About the author (2009)

James E. McWilliams is currently a fellow in the Agrarian Studies Program at Yale University and is an associate professor of history at Texas State University--San Marcos. He is the author of A Revolution in Eating: How the Quest for Food Shaped America and Building the Bay Colony: Local Economy and Society in Early Massachusetts.

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