North-west Territory: Reports of Progress; Together with a Preliminary and General Report on the Assiniboine and Saskatchewan Exploring Expedition, Made Under Instructions from the Provincial Secretary, Canada (Google eBook)

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J. Lovell, 1859 - Assiniboine River - 201 pages
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Page 56 - At the entrance to the pound there is a strong trunk of a tree placed about one foot from the ground, and on the inner side an excavation is made sufficiently deep to prevent the buffalo from leaping back when once in the pound. As soon as the animals have taken the fatal spring they begin to gallop round and round the ring fence looking for a chance...
Page 55 - From old bulls to calves of three months old, 555 animals of every age were huddled together in all the forced attitudes of violent death. Some lay on their backs, with eyes starting from their heads, and tongue thrust out through clotted gore. Others were impaled on the horns of the old and strong bulls. Others again, which had been tossed, were lying with broken backs two and three deep. One little calf hung suspended on the horns of a bull which had impaled it in the wild race round and round...
Page 55 - The chiefs son asked me if I would like to see the old buffalo pound, in which they had been entrapping buffalo during the past week. With a ready compliance I accompanied the guide to a little valley between sand hills, through a lane of branches of trees, which are called ' dead men,' to the gate or trap of the pound.
Page 56 - ... climb to the top of the fence, and, with the hunters who have followed closely in the rear of the buffalo, spear or shoot with bows and arrows or fire-arms at the bewildered animals, rapidly becoming frantic with rage and terror, within the narrow limits of the pound.
Page 106 - Cass's party found , in 1819, buffaloes on the east side of the Mississippi, above the falls of St. Anthony. Every year this animal's rovings are restricted. In 1822, the limit of its wanderings down the St. Peter was Great Swan lake , near Camp Crescent. In 1823, the Gentlemen of the Columbia Fur Company were obliged to travel five days , in a north-west direction from lake Travers, before they fell in with the game, but...
Page 2 - The region of country to which your explorations are to be then directed is that lying to the west of Lake Winipeg and Red River, and embraced (or nearly so) between the rivers Saskatchewan and Assiniboine, as far west as " South Branch House," on the former river, which latter place will be the most westerly point of your exploration. 4. It will be your endeavor to procure all the information in your power respecting the geology, natural history, topography and meteorology of the region above indicated....
Page 172 - ... far apart. If the specimens had been obtained from the altered rocks of the Lower Silurian series, there would have been little hesitation in pronouncing them to be fossils.
Page 56 - A dreadful scene of confusion and slaughter then begins; the oldest and strongest animals crush and toss the weaker; the shouts and screams of the excited Indians rise above the roaring of the bulls, the bellowing of the cows, and the piteous moaning of the calves.
Page 116 - ... Dakotahs have a common and a sacred language. The conjuror, the war prophet, and the dreamer employ a language in which words are borrowed from other Indian tongues and dialects ; they make much use of descriptive expressions, and use words apart from the ordinary signification. The Ojibways abbreviate their sentences and employ many elliptical forms of expression, so much so that half-breeds, quite familiar with the colloquial language, fail to comprehend a medicine man when in the full flow...
Page 114 - If a Mohawk married a Delaware woman, she and her children were not only Delaware still, but ever continued aliens, unless naturalized as Mohawks, with the forms and ceremonies prescribed in case of adoption." The difficulty of obtaining reliable information respecting the Indian population has been acknowledged by all who have given attention to this subject. I am convinced that the number of Indians inhabiting Rupert's Land has been considerably overrated. The estimates published in the Appendix...

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