The Emergence of Meiji Japan

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Marius B. Jansen
Cambridge University Press, Sep 29, 1995 - History - 351 pages
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This paperback edition brings together chapters from volume 5 of The Cambridge History of Japan. Japan underwent momentous changes during the middle decades of the nineteenth century. This book chronicles the hardships of the Tempo era in the 1830s, the crisis of values and confidence during the last half century of Tokugawa rule, and the political process that finally brought down the Tokugawa regime and ended centuries of warrior rule. It goes on to discuss the samurai rebellions against the Meiji Restoration, and national movements for constitutional government which indirectly resulted in the Meiji Constitution of 1889. The significance of Japan's Meiji transformation for the rest of the world is the subject of the final chapter, in which Professor Akira Iriye discusses Japan's drive to Great Power status. 'Constitutional rule at home, imperialism abroad', became new goals for early twentieth-century Japan.
  

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Contents

I
1
II
2
III
5
IV
9
V
11
VI
18
VII
24
VIII
40
XXI
161
XXII
171
XXIII
178
XXIV
181
XXV
189
XXVI
196
XXVII
203
XXVIII
208

IX
43
X
49
XI
53
XII
63
XIII
67
XIV
83
XV
100
XVI
116
XVII
137
XVIII
144
XIX
150
XX
156
XXIX
218
XXX
238
XXXI
262
XXXII
268
XXXIII
275
XXXIV
280
XXXV
294
XXXVI
312
XXXVII
331
XXXVIII
345
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