Speeches of Henry Lord Brougham, upon questions relating to public rights, duties, and interests: with historical introductions, and a critical dissertation upon the eloquence of the ancients, Volume 4 (Google eBook)

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A. and C. Black, 1838 - Great Britain
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Page 449 - Who is it," said the jealous ruler over the desert, encroached upon by the restless foot of English adventure " who is it that causes this river to rise in the high mountains, and to empty itself into the ocean ? Who is it that causes to blow the loud winds of winter, and that calms them again in...
Page 450 - ... freedom, am I to hear of faction. I wish for nothing but to breathe, in this our island, in common with my fellow-subjects, the air of liberty. I have no ambition, unless it be the ambition to break your chain and contemplate your glory.
Page 450 - ... by the arms, inspiration, and providence of the present moment, tell us the rule by which we shall go assert the law of Ireland declare the liberty of the land. " I will not be answered by a public lie in the shape of an amendment ; neither, speaking for the subject's freedom, am I to hear of faction.
Page 450 - Hereafter, when these things shall be history, your age of thraldom and poverty, your sudden resurrection, commercial redress, and miraculous armament...
Page 449 - Gentlemen, I think I can observe that you are touched with this way of considering the subject ; and I can account for it. I have not been considering it through the cold medium of books, but have been speaking of man and his nature, and of human dominion, from what I have seen of them myself, amongst reluctant nations submitting to our authority. I know what they feel, and how such feelings can alone be suppressed.
Page 450 - I might, as a constituent, come to your bar, and demand my liberty. I do call upon you, by the laws of the land and their violation...
Page 450 - I wish for nothing but to breathe, in this our island, in common with my fellow-subjects, the air of liberty. I have no ambition, unless it be the ambition to break your chain, and contemplate your glory. I never will be satisfied so long as the meanest cottager in Ireland has a link of the British chain clanking to his rags. He may be naked, he shall not be in irons.
Page 449 - Who is it that causes to blow the loud winds of winter, and that calms them again in the summer ? Who is it that rears up the shade of those lofty forests, and blasts them with the quick lightning at his pleasure ? The same Being who gave to you a country on the other side of the waters, and gave ours to us ; and by this title we will defend it ! ' said the warrior, throwing down his tomahawk upon the ground, and raising the war-sound of his nation.
Page 457 - Neither is it on deeds like these that I plume myself. But would you justly estimate my outworks, you will find armaments, and cities, and settlements, and harbours, and...
Page 433 - ... sufficiently narrow compass, being the actual state of public affairs, and the victories or the defeats which had, within the memory of all, attended their arms, or the transactions which had taken place among them in very recent times. No detailed statements were therefore wanted for their information. He was really speaking to them respecting their own affairs, or rather respecting what they had just been doing or witnessing themselves. Hence a very short allusion alone was generally required...

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