Dark Dreams 2.0: A Psychological History of the Modern Horror Film from the 1950s to the 21st Century

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McFarland, Oct 29, 2009 - Performing Arts - 447 pages
3 Reviews
Greatly expanded and updated from the 1977 original, this new edition explores the evolution of the modern horror film, particularly as it reflects anxieties associated with the atomic bomb, the Cold War, 1960s violence, sexual liberation, the Reagan revolution, 9/11 and the Iraq War. It divides modern horror into three varieties (psychological, demonic and apocalyptic) and demonstrates how horror cinema represents the popular expression of everyday fears while revealing the forces that influence American ideological and political values. Directors given a close reading include Alfred Hitchcock, Brian De Palma, David Cronenberg, Guillermo Del Toro, Michael Haneke, Robert Aldrich, Mel Gibson and George A. Romero. Additional material discusses postmodern remakes, horror franchises and Asian millennial horror. This book also contains more than 950 frame grabs and a very extensive filmography.
  

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Review: Dark Dreams 2.0: A Psychological History of the Modern Horror Film from the 1950s to the 21st Century

User Review  - Rachel - Goodreads

I really enjoyed the insights in this book! I'll pay more attention to mirrors, reflections, and staircases when I see them in movies! Read full review

Review: Dark Dreams 2.0: A Psychological History of the Modern Horror Film from the 1950s to the 21st Century

User Review  - Dean - Goodreads

It's so refreshing to read something about horror film that's not just the same old facts and purile opinions, as a fan I read a LOT of crap, this isn't crap. I loved the Psychological analysis of ... Read full review

Contents

Millennial Nightmares 2009
107
Appendix I
347
Appendix II
349
Appendix III
365
Notes
409
Bibliography
413
Index
415
Copyright

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About the author (2009)

Charles Derry is professor emeritus of motion picture studies at Wright State University. He has written widely on a variety of popular culture topics, including film, television and ideology.

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