Easter eggs, a sketch of a good old custom (Google eBook)

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W.H. Cremer, 1870
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Page 4 - First was Chaos and Night, and black Erebus and vast Tartarus; And there was neither Earth, nor Air, nor Heaven: but in the boundless bosoms of Erebus.
Page 11 - They have an ancient custom at Coleshill, in the county of Warwick, that if the young men of the town can catch a hare, and bring it to the parson of the parish before ten o'clock on Easter Monday, the parson is bound to give them a calf's head and a hundred of eggs for their breakfast, and a groat in money.
Page 10 - Resurrection, whereof they rejoice. For when two friends meet during the Easter holidays (after the salutations of the day have been passed between them) they kiss and exchange their eggs, both men and women continuing in kissing four days together." "An eyewitness," in describing the " Feast of Paque " as kept at Moscow on the 5th of April, 1702, says that the bells were rung during all the night which preceded the fete, and likewise during the gala day, and the morrow. The eggs were distributed...
Page 8 - Brun states that on the 2oth of March, 1704, the Persians celebrated, during several days, the festival of their solar new year ; and that, inter alia, the people made presents to one another of coloured eggs — eggs, it may be assumed, which presented that rich brilliancy of colour and variety of ornamentation which is conspicuous in the decorative works of Eastern nations. Travellers who stop at Smyrna at Easter time are unmercifully pestered by boys who crowd around them with strings of eggs,...
Page 14 - ... distributing Easter Eggs was once general, and it still survives in some parts. It can be traced back with certainty to the thirteenth century, and there are doubtless records of the practice at an earlier period. An entry in the roll of the household expenses of Edward I. is to the effect that i8d. were disbursed for 400 eggs at Easter— for the seasonable gifts, of course. Tradescant, the Dutch gardener to Charles I., had in the museum which he established at Lambeth, specimens of the " Easter...
Page 10 - Persons of distinction kept their eggs within doors, and made gifts of them to visitors, ejaculating as they did so the words given above, which were reiterated by the visitors with emphasis. The ordinary people gave their eggs in the streets. Domestics offered them to their masters and mistresses, and received presents in return. In Germany the Easter egg is a very popular gift. Among the middle classes in Naples, the merry-making at Easter includes presents of...
Page 14 - ... infinite variety. Paris has now become the rival of Vienna in the fabrication and display of the Easter egg. In England the custom of distributing Easter Eggs was once general, and it still survives in some parts. It can be traced back with certainty to the thirteenth century, and there are doubtless records of the practice at an earlier period. An entry in the roll of the household expenses of Edward I. is to the effect that 18d.
Page 7 - ... Persians, when they keep the festival of the solar year (in March) mutually present each other with coloured eggs." The origin of popular customs generally is a subject hard to unravel ; but the subject of " Easter eggs " appears to be less so than most. Some authorities content themselves by supposing that in the infancy of Christianity, the old pagan emblem, and the proceedings by which expression was given to it, were adapted to symbolise and commemorate the Resurrection and the new life....
Page 11 - Easter-egg custom is very tenaciously observed to this day, a nest is in some parts made of moss, and a hare is set in it. This being hidden in the house or garden, the children are sent to Icok for the eggs that the hare has laid. In many districts, says Mr. Cremer ('Easter Eggs,
Page 8 - ... different countries of distributing eggs, and at the various artistic imitations of eggs, at this Easter season. There can be little doubt that the mere act of making presents at this time of the year throughout the Christian world is traceable to the offerings (or, in ecclesiastical parlance, the " customary dues ") which were, and are still made to the Church at Easter, by all sorts and conditions of the Catholic laity. The practice of interchanging eggs was popular in Persia more than a century...

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