The London journal of arts and sciences (and repertory of patent inventions) [afterw.] Newton's London journal of arts and sciences (Google eBook)

Front Cover
William Newton
1865
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Page 101 - Engineer, being the art of directing the great sources of power in Nature for the use and convenience of man...
Page 289 - Up to about the year 1815, it was penal to discharge sewage or other offensive matters into the sewers ; cesspools were regarded as the proper receptacles for house drainage, and sewers as the legitimate channels for carrying off the surface waters only. Afterwards it became permissive, and in the year 1847 the first act was obtained making it compulsory to drain houses into sewers."* The construction of systems of impervious, self-cleansing sewers is to be dated from this time.
Page 300 - Tin, on the other hand, appears to preserve the rinc, but to assist the action of sea water upon the copper. The great difference between the action of sea water upon pure copper and upon Muntz metal seems to us to be due not only to the fact that copper is alloyed to zinc, but to the small proportion of lead and iron which that alloy contains, and there can be no doubt that shipbuilders derive great benefit by using it for the keels of their vessels.
Page 292 - As regards the time of discharge, it is demonstrated by the same series of experiments that " The delivery of the sewage at high water into the river at any point is equivalent to its discharge at low water at a point 12 miles lower down the river, therefore the construction of 12 miles of sewer is saved by discharging the sewage at high instead of low water.
Page 291 - ... designed to dispose of sewage and storm water from such a varied area is necessarily of a complicated nature. The system was established with the principal object of intercepting and conveying, as far as practicable by gravitation, to points of discharge at some distance down the river below London, all the sewage, together with so much of the rainfall mixed with it as could be reasonably dealt with. At the time when the system was established...
Page 370 - From the upper pool the water passes into the main reservoir over similar cast iron gauge plates. The water is drawn from the reservoir by pipes laid in a tunnel cut through the rock in the solid, at the end of the main embankment, no pipes being laid through the embankments themselves. At the end of the tunnel next the reservoir there is a stand-pipe with valves at different heights, which admit of water being drawn off at various levels. The water passes down the stand-pipe and along a...
Page 243 - Eailway, who commenced experiments with this material in 1861 ; carefully, though trustingly, he tried it step by step, not even at first venturing to employ it for passenger trains, but as proofs of its safety and economy crowded upon him, he carefully applied it to the most important parts of passenger engines, and even to the manufacture of the formidable engine cranks (at that time...
Page 112 - With respect to the rules that govern the construction of specifications, they are the ordinary rules for the interpretation of written instruments, having regard especially to the fact that the specification must clearly fulfil the obligation imposed on the patentee by the proviso contained in all letters patent, namely, that the grant shall be void if the patentee...
Page 49 - ... base of the cast-iron crane pillar H. The base G of the crane is sufficiently long to secure its stability when the maximum load is lifted over the rail or lengthways of the crane base. In these cranes, owing to the high speed at which the driving cord runs, the power is applied at a very long leverage over the load to be lifted. The velocity of the cord is in all cases 5000 feet per minute, and in the overhead traversers the heavy loads are lifted at the rate of 1 foot 7 inches per minute,...
Page 245 - In conclusion, it may be remarked that cast steel is now being used as a substitute for iron to a great and rapidly increasing extent. The jury reports of the International Exhibition of 1851, show that the entire production of steel of all kinds in Sheffield was, at that period, 35,000 tons annually, of which about 18,000 tons were cast steel, equal to 346 tons per week...

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