Wine, Women, and Song: Students' Songs of the Middle Ages

Front Cover
Courier Corporation, 2002 - Music - 180 pages
1 Review
From the 13th-century manuscript known as the Carmina Burana come these love songs, drinking songs, hymns to spring, and more. Sung by the wandering students of the Middle Ages, these verses include "Welcome to Spring," "Love Among the Maidens," "Wine and Venus," "Death Takes All," many others. 6 black-and-white illustrations.
  

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Review: Wine, Women, And Song

User Review  - Sandra - Goodreads

Though I didn't care much for the poetry of the Wandering Students, this book was still an enjoyable read. John Addington Symonds is a sympathetic editor, and his background information, motivation ... Read full review

Contents

NO PAC K ESSAY
1
ON THE ORDER OF WANDERING STUDENTS
40
ON THE DECAY OF THE ORDER
45
A WANDERING STUDENTS PETITION
48
A SONG OF THE OPEN ROAD
50
THE CONFESSION OF GOLIAS
53
WELCOME TO SPRING
63
THE LOVER AND THE NIGHTINGALE
64
FLORA AND PHYLLIS PART III
100
FLOS FLORAE
106
A BIRDS SONG OF LOVE
107
To LYDIA
109
A POEM OF PRIVACY i1 1
111
FLORA
112
THE LOVERS MONOLOGUE
114
THE INVITATION TO LOVE
116

THE INVITATION TO YOUTH
66
THE Vow TO CUPID
67
u AMAYING
68
THE RETURN OF SPRING
69
THE SWEETNESS OF THE SPRING
70
THE SUIT TO PHYLLIS
71
MODEST LOVE
73
THE SERENADE TO FLOWEROTHETHORN
74
THE LOVELETTER IN SPRING
75
A SPRING DITTY
76
LOVEDOUBTS
77
THE VILLAGE DANCE
78
LOVE AMONG THE MAIDENS
81
NO PAGl 22 AT THE VILLAGE DANCE
82
INVITATION TO THE DANCE
84
A PASTORAL
87
THE WOOING
89
A DESCANT UPON SLEEP AND LOVE
93
FLORA AND PHYLLIS PART I
96
PHYLLIS
117
LOVE LONGINGS
119
THE LOVERS Vow
120
FAREWELL TO THE FAITHLESS
123
GRETCHEN
126
ADIEU TO THE VALLEY
127
THE LOVERS PARTING
128
IN ARTICULO MORTIS
130
A SEQUENCE IN PRAISE OF WINE
134
A CAROL OF WINE
135
THE STUDENTS WINEBOUT
137
TIMES AFLYING
138
THERES NO LUST LIKE TO POETRY
139
BACCHIC FRENZY
149
THE ABBOT OF COCKAIGNE
157
GAUDEAMUS IGITUR
164
vii
172
LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
184
Copyright

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About the author (2002)

John Addington Symonds was born in Bristol on 5 October 1840. Symonds attended first a private tutor's in Clifton, then to Harrow, then to Balliol and later to Magdalen. In 1860 he took a first in " Mods," and won the Newdigate with a poem on The Escorial; in 1862 he was placed in the first class in Literae Humaniores, and in the following year was winner of the Chancellor's English Essay. In 1862 he had been elected to an open fellowship at Magdalen. The strain of study unfortunately proved too great for him, and, immediately after his election to a fellowship, his health broke down, and he was obliged to seek rest in Switzerland. Symonds was plagued by ill health, and he would die of tuberculosis at the age of 52. During his last term at Oxford, in 1863 his health collapsed altogether, partly due to stress caused by the spread of rumours that he was having a homosexual affair with one of the students. His academic career was at an end, and for three years he was unable to do any work. He thought he might study law, but in 1865 it was discovered that his left lung was diseased, and after a complete rest it was decided that he could never follow a profession, but would have to go to a warmer, climate and become a writer. He spent the rest of his years between Switzerland and Venice, Italy. For many years Symonds's energy was wasted by trying to suppress his homosexuality. Essentially he wished to make homosexuality acceptable, both to himself and to society by idealizing it in his works. It is for his studies in the history of art that Symonds has been most highly praised and remembered, as well as his Rennaissance work. John Addington Symonds died at Rome on April 8, 1893.

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