A Sioux Chronicle

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University of Oklahoma Press, 1956 - History - 331 pages
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Though confined to the great Dakota reservation in 1878, the still-defiant Sioux did not end their struggle with the white man until well into the twentieth century. Throughout the last decades of the nineteenth century the Sioux-finding themselves united for the first time in their history-waged a cold war with the United States Department of the Interior, the Indian Bureau, the various Indian agents sent to supervise Sioux Reservation life, and the so-called Indian Friends of the East, who sought to "school and church" the Sioux into submission.

  

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Contents

The Great Reservation
3
Spotted Tail Departs
26
Red Cloud as Lucifer
69
The Adventures of the Three Musketeers
107
The Brethren
145
A Very Little Progress
164
Never Call Retreat
184
Shakedown
202
Messiah
229
Whirlwind
246
Touch and Go
268
Disaster
291
Copyright

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About the author (1956)

George E. Hyde was born in Omaha, Nebraska, in 1882. As a boy he became interested in Indians and began writing about them in 1910. He has produced some of the most important books on the American Indian ever written, including Indians of the High Plains, Indians of the Woodlands, Red Cloud's Folk, Spotted Tail's Folk, and Life of George Bent, all published by the University of Oklahoma Press. Hyde died in Omaha, Nebraska, in 1968 at the age of 86.

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