Canada and the First World War: Essays in Honour of Robert Craig Brown

Front Cover
University of Toronto Press, Jan 1, 2005 - History - 452 pages
0 Reviews

The First World War is often credited as being the event that gave Canada its own identity, distinct from that of Britain, France, and the United States. Less often noted, however, is that it was also the cause of a great deal of friction within Canadian society. The fifteen essays contained in Canada and the First World War examine how Canadians experienced the war and how their experiences were shaped by region, politics, gender, class, and nationalism.

Editor David MacKenzie has brought together some of the leading voices in Canadian history to take in-depth looks into the tensions and fractures the war caused and to address the way some attitudes and perceptions about the country were changed while others remained the same. The essays vary in scope, but are strongly unified so as to create a collection that treats its subject in a complete and comprehensive manner.

Canada and the First World War is a tribute to esteemed University of Toronto historian Robert Craig Brown, one of Canada's greatest authorities on World War One, and the contributors include a cross-section of his friends, colleagues, contemporaries, and former students. Together, they provide a fitting tribute to a scholar who has contributed greatly to Canadians' understanding of their past. The collection is a significant contribution to the on-going re-examination of Canada's experiences in war.

  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Myth Memory and the Transformation of Canadian Society
3
Craig Browns Logical Reason
15
The Military Effort 19141918
35
Conscription in the Great War
62
Political Leadership in the First World War
76
Against Isolationism Napoleon Belcourt French Canada and La grande guerre
96
The Economic Impact of the Great War
138
Mobilizing Women for War
157
Ethnic and Class Relations in Western Canada during the First World War A Case Study of European Immigrants and AngloCanadian Nativism
272
The Crusade for Science Science and Technology on the Home Front 19141918
300
Canada Invaded The Great War Mass Culture and Canadian Cultural Nationalism
323
Eastern Approaches Maritime Canada and Newfoundland
350
Canada and the Peace Settlements
379
Remembering Armageddon
409
Contributors
435
Index
439

Supporting Soldiers Families Separation Allowance Assigned Pay and the Unexpected
194
Ontario and the Great War
230

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2005)

David MacKenzie is an associate professor in the Department of History at Ryerson University.

Bibliographic information