In Search of the Grand Trunk: Ghost Rail Lines in Ontario

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Dundurn, 2011 - Transportation - 241 pages
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Explore Ontario's forgotten rail lines and experience the legacy and lore of this the vital railway era of Ontario's history. At its peak between 1880 and the 1920s, Ontario was criss-crossed by more than 20,000 kilometres of rail trackage. Today , only a fraction remains. Yet trains once hauled everything from strawberries to grain, cans of milk and even eels. Villagers depended on trains to visit friends, attend weddings, to shop, and to go to school. They gathered on station platforms to await their mail or greet a long-lost relative. Holidayers packed their trunks and headed north for an extended summer day at their favorite resorts. Today, these are but a distant memory as most of Ontario‚e(tm)s once essential transportation links lie abandoned and largely forgotten.

But perhaps not entirely -- many rights of way have become rail trails, and now witness hikers, cyclists, equestrians, and snowmobilers. Others sadly, lie overgrown and barely visible. Yet regardless of how one follows these early routes, one will find preserved stations, historic bridges, and railway era buildings, all of which recall this bygone era.

  

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Contents

Acknowledements
9
HISTORIC RAIL LINE ABBREVIATIONS
11
INTRODUCTION
15
The Ghost Rail Lines of Central Ontario
19
The Ghosts of the Grand Trunk
21
The Grand Junction Railway Belleville to Peterborough
28
The Cobourg and Peterborough Railway
32
The Midland Railway Port Hope to Midland
36
The Toronto Grey and Bruce Railway Toronto to Owen Sound
133
The Buffalo Brantford and Goderich Railway Fort Erie to Stratford
141
The Toronto Hamilton and Buffalo Railway Hamilton to Waterford
147
The Brantford Norfolk and Port Burwell Railway Brantford to Port Burwell
151
The Canada Air Line Welland to Glencoe
155
The Port Dover and Huron and the Stratford and Huron Railways Port Dover to Owen Sound
160
The Guelph and Goderich Line Guelph to Goderich
167
The Lake Erie and Northern Railway Galt to Port Dover
172

The Whitby Port Perry and Lindsay Railway
43
The Toronto and Nipissing Railway The Coby Connection
47
The Lindsay Bobcaygeon and Pontypool Railway Burketon to Bobcaygeon
51
The Victoria Railway Into the Haliburton Highlands
55
The Georgian Bay and Seaboard Line Dranoel to Port McNicoll
61
The Hamilton and Northwestern Railway Port Dover to Meaford
66
The Radials and the Belt Line Ontarios Early Commuter Railways
75
The Ghost Rail Lines of Eastern Ontario
85
The Ottawa and New York Railway Cornwall to Ottawa
87
The Thousand Islands Railway Gananoque to the Grand Trunk
91
The Brockville Westport and Sault Ste Marie Railway Brockville to Westport
95
The Kingston and Pembroke Railway Kingston to Renfrew
99
Rathbuns Road the Bay of Quinte Railway Deseronto to Bannockburn
104
The Prince Edward County Railway Picton to Trenton
109
The Central Ontario Railway Trenton to Maynooth
113
The Canadian Northern Railway Ontarios Forgotten Main Linefrom Toronto to Hawkesbury
119
The Ghost Rail Lines of the Southwest
127
The Credit Valley Line Cataract to Elora
129
The Wellington Grey and Bruce Line Harrisburg to Southampton
177
The Canada Southern Railway Fort Erie to Blenheim
185
The Northlands Ghost Rail Lines
191
The Canadian Northern RailwaysAlgonquin Route Pembroke to Capreol
193
The Ottawa Arnprior and Parry Sound Railway the Booth Line Renfrew to Depot Harbour
199
The Lake Huron and Northern Ontario Railway Bruce Mines to Rock Lake
208
The Manitoulin and North Shore Railway Sudbury to Little Current
211
The Port Arthur and Duluth Railway the PeeDee Line Thunder Bay to Rock Lake
215
The Smoky Falls Railway Kapuskasing to Smoky Falls
218
The End of the Line?
221
NOTES
223
SUGGESTED READING
231
INDEX
235
ABOUT THE AUTHOR
243
Also by Ron Brown
245
Back Cover
249
Copyright

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About the author (2011)

Ron Brown has written extensively on the railway heritage of Ontario and Canada. He has documented in photographs most of our country‚e(tm)s surviving stations, and all of Ontario‚e(tm)s stations. He has traversed the rail routes and researched their stories throughout the province. Ron and his wife June live in East York in Toronto.

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