Alexander Hamilton (Google eBook)

Front Cover
C. Scribner's Sons, 1920 - Statesmen - 381 pages
0 Reviews
Om den amerikanske statsmand Alexander Hamilton (1755-1804).
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Related books

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 193 - States, to devise such further provisions as shall appear to them necessary to render the constitution of the federal government adequate to the exigencies of the union...
Page 201 - ... whether societies of men are really capable or not of establishing good government from reflection and choice, or whether they are forever destined to depend, for their political constitutions, on accident and force.
Page 287 - ... by God he had rather be in his grave than in his present situation ; that he had rather be on his farm than to be made Emperor of the world; and yet that they were charging him with wanting to be a King.
Page 256 - Not only the wealth, but the independence and security of a country, appear to be materially connected with the prosperity of manufactures. Every nation, with a view to those great objects, ought to endeavor to possess within itself all the essentials of national supply.
Page 325 - I will never send another Minister to France without assurances that he will be received, respected, and honored, as the representative of a great, free, powerful, and independent nation.
Page 76 - Had we formed a permanent army in the beginning, which, by the continuance of the same men in service, had been capable of discipline, we never should have had to retreat with a handful of men across the Delaware in '76, trembling for the fate of America, which nothing but the infatuation of the enemy could have saved...
Page 249 - That every power vested in a government is in its nature sovereign, and includes, by force of the term, a right to employ all the means requisite and fairly applicable to the attainment of the ends of such power, and which are not precluded by restrictions and exceptions specified in the Constitution, or not immoral, or not contrary to the essential ends of political society.
Page 77 - ... should not have been, the greatest part of the war, inferior to the enemy, indebted for our safety to their inactivity, enduring frequently the mortification of seeing inviting opportunities to ruin them pass unimproved for want of a force which the country was completely able to afford, and of seeing the country ravaged, our towns burnt, the inhabitants plundered, abused, murdered, with impunity from the same cause.
Page 217 - ... of his own; he soon begins to think that he may be happy, great and glorious, by oppressing his fellow citizens; and that...
Page 345 - I may have been influenced by misconstruction or misinformation. It is also my ardent wish that I may have been more mistaken than I think I have been, and that he, by his future conduct, may show himself worthy of all confidence and esteem, and prove an ornament and blessing to the country.

Bibliographic information