Natives and Newcomers: Canada's "Heroic Age" Reconsidered

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McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP, Jul 1, 1986 - History - 430 pages
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According to convential nineteenth-century wisdom, societies of European origin were naturally progressive; native societies were static. One consequence of this attitutde was the almost universal separation of history and anthropology. Today, despite a growing interest in changes in Amerindian societies, this dichotomy continues to distort the investigation of Canadian history and to assign native peoples only a marginal place in it.
  

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Contents

History
3
Parkman and American
9
The Charlevoix Tradition
20
Nationalist Histories
29
Victorian Anthropology in Canada
39
Recent Trends
45
The Approach of the Europeans
111
Early European Contact
118
The Historical Petuns and Neutrals
221
The Killing Years
229
The Impact of Epidemics
242
Conversions and Factionalism
251
The Destruction of the Hurons
259
Iroquois Supremacy
273
The Saviour of New France
281
The Iroquois Missions
289

Traders and Colonizers
164
Trade and Warfare 16001615
172
The Nature of Indian Trade
183
European Traders
194
Missionaries
200
Heroes and Victims
297
Notes on Sources
345
References
357
Index
399
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About the author (1986)

Bruce G. Trigger is James McGill Professor in the Department of Anthropology at McGill University. He received his PhD from Yale University and has carried out archaeological research in Egypt and the Sudan. His interests include the comparative study of early civilizations, the history of archaeology, and archaeological and anthropological theory. He has received various scholarly awards, including the prestigious Prix L on G rin from the Quebec government, for his sustained contributions to the social sciences. He is an honorary fellow of the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland and an honorary member of the Prehistoric Society (UK). His numerous books include the first edition of A History of Archaeological Thought (Cambridge 1989), The Cambridge History of the Native Peoples of the Americas, Volume 1 (Cambridge 1996), co-edited with Wilcomb E. Washburn, and Understanding Early Civilizations (Cambridge 2003).

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