The Lorax

Front Cover
Random House, 1971 - Juvenile Fiction - 70 pages
167 Reviews
Long before “going green” was mainstream, Dr. Seuss's Lorax spoke for the trees and warned of the dangers of disrespecting the environment. In this cautionary rhyming tale, we learn of the Once-ler, who came across a valley of Truffula Trees and Brown Bar-ba-loots (“frisking about in their Bar-ba-loot suits as they played in the shade and ate Truffula Fruits”), and how his harvesting of the tufted trees changed the landscape forever. With the release of the blockbuster film version, the Lorax and his classic tale have educated a new generation of young readers not only about the importance of seeing the beauty in the world around us, but also about our responsibility to protect it.
  

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The illustrations are very good too. - LibraryThing
Yes, it's a sad book, but it has a hopeful ending. - LibraryThing
The colors are bright and the pictures are fanciful. - LibraryThing
But I love the big idea and the illustrations. - LibraryThing
The plot of the book is also another thing that I like. - LibraryThing

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - burnit99 - LibraryThing

Dr. Seuss sometimes wandered into the political arena, as with this treatment of damaged ecologies, endangered species, pollution, and the role of Big Business in contributing to these problems. The message of the Lorax seems even more relevant in these days of climate change and corporate greed. Read full review

Review: The Lorax

User Review  - Leah - Goodreads

The Lorax has the same structure as most Dr. Seuss books. It had the classic Dr. Seuss's cartoon style art work and classic rhyming method. The story started off with a curious boy who wished to know ... Read full review

All 16 reviews »

Selected pages

Contents

Section 1
Section 2
Section 3
Section 4
Section 5
Section 6
Section 7
Section 8
Copyright

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About the author (1971)

THEODOR SEUSS GEISEL--aka Dr. Seuss--is one of the most beloved children's book authors of all time. From The Cat in the Hat to Oh, the Places You'll Go!, his iconic characters, stories, and art style have been a lasting influence on generations of children and adults. The books he wrote and illustrated under the name Dr. Seuss (and others that he wrote but did not illustrate, including some under the pseudonyms Theo. LeSieg and Rosetta Stone) have been translated into thirty languages. Hundreds of millions of copies have found their way into homes and hearts around the world. Dr. Seuss's long list of awards includes Caldecott Honors for McElligot's Pool, If I Ran the Zoo, and Bartholomew and the Oobleck, the Pulitzer Prize, and eight honorary doctorates. Works based on his original stories have won three Oscars, three Emmys, three Grammys, and a Peabody.

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