Imperial Russian Foreign Policy

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Hugh Ragsdale, V. N. Ponomarev
Cambridge University Press, Oct 29, 1993 - History - 457 pages
1 Review
This book provides an introduction suitable for both specialist and non-specialist to the principal traditions, objectives, conditions, and instruments of Russian foreign policy, 1700-1917, through the presentation of new research. It is both the first cooperative effort in the subject by both Russian and Western historians and the first to be consciously representative of the spirit of glasnost and a post-Cold War mentality. It is based to a large extent on previously inaccessible Russian manuscript source materials, and it contains the only serious scholarly surveys of both the historiography and the bibliography of the subject.
  

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Contents

the traditions of Imperial Russian foreign
1
The imperial heritage of Peter the Great in
21
The role of the Baltic in Russian foreign policy
36
EIGHTEENTH CENTURY
75
Runaway peasants and Russian motives for
103
Policy traditions and the Menshikov mission of 1853
119
The personal responsibility of Emperor Nicholas I
159
Russian policy and the United States during
173
The sale of Alaska in the context of RussoAmerican
193
Russias Balkan policies under Alexander II 1855
219
The foreign policy of Russia in the Far East at
247
domestic factors
268
The historiography of Imperial Russian foreign
360
Afterword
445
Index
451
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About the author (1993)

HUGH RAGSDALE, Professor of History at the University of Alabama, is the author of Paul I: A Reassessment of His Life and Reign; and Detente in the Napoleonic Era: Bonaparte and the Russians.

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