Erotic Tales of the Victorian Age

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Bram Stoker
Prometheus, 1998 - Fiction - 246 pages
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Despite rigid moral codes, some nineteenth-century writers flaunted convention by producing erotica published by underground houses and distributed widely, much to the chagrin of religious and political leaders of the Victorian Age. And while today it seems that writing about sexuality is completely uninhibited, it pales in comparison to the steamy and graphic yet romantically inviting and colorful works authored many years ago.

The most notorious and lusty stories from the Victorian era have been assembled here in all of their sexual splendor. Readers will want to carry a tissue to dab their brow, or simply read this passionate pillowtalk in the presence of their soulmate!

Erotic Tales of the Victorian Age includes selections from the spicy "Eveline" by Anonymous, the story of a resourceful young woman who enjoys teasing various men by letting her hands wander; "My Secret Life" by "Walter", which explores the author's carnal travellog; the lusty "Rosa Fielding" by Anonymous; "Therese Raquin" by Emile Zola; "My Life and Loves" by Frank Harris; the infamous "Venus in India" by Charles Devereaux, describing the author's sexual exploits as a member of the British Army; "The Perfumed Garden" by Sir Richard Burton, which reads like a Victorian Joy of Sex; tantalizing extracts from Dracula by Bram Stoker, and more.

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Contents

ANONYMOUS
1
ANONYMOUS
36
EMILE ZOLA
53
Copyright

5 other sections not shown

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About the author (1998)

Bram Stoker was born in Dublin, the son of a civil servant. Although a semi-invalid as a child, he went on the gain a reputation as a fine athlete at Trinity College, where he also excelled in mathematics and philosophy. Stoker worked as a civil servant and a journalist before becoming the personal secretary of the famous actor Henry Irving. He also wrote 15 works of fiction, only one of which is very memorable - Dracula (1897). This work, involving hypnotism, magic, the supernatural, and other elements of gothic fiction, went on to sell over one million copies and is still selling strongly today. So well known has his fictional character become that today it is possible to visit the castle of Count Dracula in the Transylvanian region of Romania, a country that Stoker never visited. Several film versions of the story, both serious and comic, have made Stoker's work a part of modern mythology. His novel The Lair of the White Worm (1911) has also been made into film. It and the novel The Lady of the Shroud are, like Dracula, fantastic tales of horror.

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