Language

Front Cover
Stephen Everson
Cambridge University Press, Jul 7, 1994 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 280 pages
0 Reviews
This volume is devoted to ancient theories of language. The chapters range over more than eight hundred years of philosophical enquiry, and provide critical analyses of all the principal accounts of how it is that language can have meaning and how we can come to acquire linguistic understanding. The discussions move from the naturalism examined in Plato's Cratylus to the sophisticated theories of the Hellenistic schools and the work of St. Augustine. The relations between thought about language and metaphysics, philosophy of mind and the development of grammar are also explored.
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Introduction
1
Plato on understanding language
10
Cratylus theory of names and its refutation
28
Aristotle on names and their signification
37
Epicurus on mind and language
74
The Stoic notion of a lekton
109
Parrots Pyrrhonists and native speakers
129
Analogy anomaly and Apollonius Dyscolus
149
Usage and abusage Galen on language
166
Augustine on the nature of speech
188
The verb to be in Greek philosophy some remarks
212
Bibliography
237
Index of names
264
Index of passages discussed
269
Index of subjects
277
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (1994)

Stephen Everson is Assistant Professor of Philosophy at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. He taught philosophy previously at Oxford (St Hugh's, Balliol, and Lincoln Colleges) and at Cambridge (Trinity College). He is the editor of three Companions to Ancient Thought, published by Cambridge
University Press: Epistemology (1990), Psychology (1991), and Language (1994).

Bibliographic information