The Lives of the Roman Poets: Containing a Critical and Historical Account of Them and Their Writings, with Large Quotations of Their Most Celebrated Passages, as Far as was Necessary to Compare and Illustrate Their Several Excellencies, as Well as to Discover Wherein They Were Deficient... (Google eBook)

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W. Innys, 1753 - Latin poetry
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Page 91 - O goddess-born ! escape, by timely flight, The flames and horrors of this fatal night. The foes already have possess'd the wall : Troy nods from high, and totters to her fall. Enough is paid to Priam's royal name, More than enough to duty and to fame. If by a mortal hand my father's throne Could be defended, 'twas by mine alone. Now Troy to thee commends her future state, And gives her gods companions of thy fate : From their assistance, happier walls expect, Which, wand'ring long, at last thou shalt...
Page 79 - His banished gods restored to rites divine, And settled sure succession in his line, From whence the race of Alban fathers come, And the long glories of majestic Rome.
Page 20 - Nature cast ; His vigorous and active mind was hurl'd Beyond the flaming limits of this world Into the mighty space, and there did see How things begin, what can, what cannot be : How all must...
Page 84 - The flow'ry meadows, and the feeding folds. There end your toils ; and there your fates provide A quiet kingdom, and a royal bride : There fortune shall the Trojan line restore, And you for lost Creiisa weep no more. . Fear not that I shall watch, with servile shame, Th...
Page 49 - There first the youth of heav'nly birth I view'd, For whom our monthly victims are renew'd. He heard my vows, and graciously decreed My grounds to be restor'd, my former flocks to feed.
Page 118 - Prince ; who, being taken with his merit and addrefs, admitted him to a great familiarity in his more private hours, and afterwards made him no fmall offers of preferment. The Poet had the greatnefs of mind to refufe them all ; and the Prince was generous enough not to be offended at his freedom in doing fo.
Page 110 - At least I can defer the nuptial day, And with protracted wars the peace delay: With blood the dear alliance shall be bought, And both the people near destruction brought; So shall the son-in-law and father join, With ruin, war, and waste of either line.
Page 53 - Euphrates' banks the spoils of war ; With conquering arts asserts his country's cause, With arts of peace the willing people draws ; On the glad earth the golden age renews, And his great father's path to...
Page 238 - Resistless in its course delights to rove, And cleaves the temples of its master Jove: Alike where'er it passes or returns, With equal rage the fell destroyer burns; Then with a whirl, full in its strength, retires, And recollects the Force of all its scattered fires.
Page 98 - Just in the gate, and in the jaws of hell, Revengeful Cares and sullen Sorrows dwell, And pale Diseases, and repining Age, Want, Fear, and Famine's unresisted rage; Here Toils, and Death, and Death's half-brother, Sleep (Forms terrible to view), their sentry keep; With anxious Pleasures of a guilty mind, Deep Frauds before, and open Force behind ; The Furies' iron beds; and Strife, that shakes Her hissing tresses, and unfolds her snakes.

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