And on that Farm He Had a Wife: Ontario Farm Women and Feminism, 1900-1970

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McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP, 2001 - Social Science - 234 pages
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Because men typically owned the "family farm," farm women's economic welfare depended largely on the smooth negotiation of their interconnected roles. Yet the women Halpern uncovers were surprisingly outspoken about their devaluation on the farm and about patriarchal traditions and institutions that mistreated women generally. And On That Farm He Had a Wife shows how Ontario farm wives and daughters sought to improve their lives, chiefly through the home economics movement and Women's Institutes. They committed themselves to personal development, to elevating the nature and status of their work, and to public participation in social reform designed to help others as well as themselves. All of these efforts were an expression of their social feminism, which endured even with the dramatic changes in rural life at mid-century.
  

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Contents

Writing Ontario Farming
19
Gender Conflict
27
We oldfashioned folk do not put enough science into
52
The Failure of
79
Farm Women
106
Notes
141
Bibliography
207
Index
227
Copyright

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About the author (2001)

Halpern is professor of history at the University of Western Ontario.

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