The Children of Aataentsic: A History of the Huron People to 1660, Volume 2

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McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP, 1987 - History - 913 pages
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Trigger's work integrates insights from archaeology, history, ethnology, linguistics, and geography. This wide knowledge allows him to show that, far from being a static prehistoric society quickly torn apart by European contact and the fur trade, almost every facet of Iroquoian culture had undergone significant change in the centuries preceding European contact. He argues convincingly that the European impact upon native cultures cannot be correctly assessed unless the nature and extent of precontact change is understood. His study not only stands Euro-American stereotypes and fictions on their heads, but forcefully and consistently interprets European and Indian actions, thoughts, and motives from the perspective of the Huron culture. The Children of Aataentsic revises widely accepted interpretations of Indian behaviour and challenges cherished myths about the actions of some celebrated Europeans during the "heroic age" of Canadian history. In a new preface, Trigger describes and evaluates contemporary controversies over the ethnohistory of eastern Canada.
  

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Contents

Introduction
1
Ethnohistory and the Role
11
A Statement of Methods
21
The Huron and Their Neighbours
27
PLATE 2
35
PLATE 4
41
PLATE 5
52
PLATE 6
70
PLATE 20
210
Forging an Alliance
246
PLATE 21
252
The Quiet Years
331
Notes Chapters 16
435
The Interregnum and
455
The Return of the Mohawk
463
CHAPTERS The Deadly Harvest
499

PLATE 7
85
The Birth of the Huron
105
Donaldson site near Southampton Ontario
114
PLATE 12
127
PLATE 15
141
CHAPTER4 Alien Shadows
177
Ramusios Plan of Hochelaga
191
The Storm
603
The Storm Within
665
The End of the Confederacy
725
Betrayal and Salvation
789
Conclusions
841
Copyright

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About the author (1987)

Bruce G. Trigger is James McGill Professor in the Department of Anthropology at McGill University. He received his PhD from Yale University and has carried out archaeological research in Egypt and the Sudan. His interests include the comparative study of early civilizations, the history of archaeology, and archaeological and anthropological theory. He has received various scholarly awards, including the prestigious Prix L on G rin from the Quebec government, for his sustained contributions to the social sciences. He is an honorary fellow of the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland and an honorary member of the Prehistoric Society (UK). His numerous books include the first edition of A History of Archaeological Thought (Cambridge 1989), The Cambridge History of the Native Peoples of the Americas, Volume 1 (Cambridge 1996), co-edited with Wilcomb E. Washburn, and Understanding Early Civilizations (Cambridge 2003).

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